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The World's first flying hotel - The Hotelicopter

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March 29, 2009

Hotelicopter

Hotelicopter

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March 30, 2009 The double deck Airbus A380 has set new high standards for luxury accommodation in the air but, unless you can afford to deck out your own A380 as a private jet, the Hotelicopter concept aims to top this airborne opulence by equipping a four story converted heavy lift aircraft with 18 luxuriously-appointed room hotels.

Modeled on the Soviet Mil V-12, the largest helicopter ever built, of which only two prototypes were built in the 1960s, the Hotelicopter company would like us to believe they purchased one of these prototypes in 2004 with the Hotelicopter now ready for its maiden flight in June 26th. We're not sure that we do, but we like the concept.

While the computer generated images of the Hotelicopter show a lot of imagination, the specified Maximum Takeoff Weight of 105850 kg (232,870 lb) is actually exactly same as that of the original Mil V-12 which is highly unlikely given the Hotelicopter has at entire 3 story luxury hotel added onto it. No need to remind readers that it is April 1st this week.

The design outlined at the Hotelicopter site includes soundproofed rooms, each boasting a queen-sized bed, fine linens, a mini-bar, coffee machine, wireless internet access, and all the luxurious appointments you’d expect from a flying five star hotel - there's even the promise of room service.

The original Mil V-12 was an amazingly large helicopter which absolutely dwarfs any heavy lift Helicopter in use today. Each rotor had a diameter of nearly 115 ft (35m), mounted at the end of a large wing, making the distance from the tips of each rotor blade wider than the wingspan of a Boeing 747. The two Soviet built V-12s did fly and still hold the helicopter heavy lift world record of 44,205 kg (88,636 lb) at a height of 2,255m (7,398 feet) set on August 6th 1969 but were simply too big and difficult to maneuver to be practical so never reached production.

Hotelicopter has announced a travel schedule for the flying hotel starting with the inaugural flight from John F. Kennedy International Airport June 26th 2009. Tickets will be on same at an undisclosed price once their reservation system is open. We'd like to believe it will happen, but...

Paul Evans

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10 Comments

Is this being built for DethKlok???

lane
30th March, 2009 @ 11:05 am PDT

What's the point? Even if real, it couldn't stay aloft very long or go very far, and it'd be too noisy to sleep in. The Hindenburg was much better suited for passenger service, like a flying cruise ship.

Gadgeteer
3rd April, 2009 @ 07:22 pm PDT

Lol, definitely a DethKlok machine. About as practical as well.

goodterling
10th April, 2009 @ 05:45 pm PDT

Wow, that's huge! I wonder if we could get the thing to land here on the NSW Central Coast?

Dan Larkam
29th July, 2010 @ 03:22 am PDT

its only for advertising prpose its not real

Facebook User
23rd December, 2010 @ 06:12 am PST

Why would this concept be good?! Massive fuel consumption, massive cost, and massive emissions - why is that great?!

Just as stupid as the K-7, which didn't have any suitable engines, and surprise, that too originated in the Soviet Union!

Tord S Eriksson
30th March, 2011 @ 05:00 pm PDT

http://www.snopes.com/photos/airplane/hotelicopter.asp

David Desiccant Gardner II
8th October, 2011 @ 01:18 am PDT

I don't know. A Hotelicopter, sounds like a really stupid idea, too me.

Put all the Luxury Accommodations on an Airship. And I'd say you got a great idea. But on a helicopter, it's a disaster in the making. Jackass: The Movie, Part Nth Degree. Sounds, almost as stupid as that movie made back in the '70's, The Atomic Bus.

Michael Flower
8th July, 2014 @ 07:52 am PDT

Have we had an unlimited supply of energy to keep it air borne.......

Dave Ussery
9th July, 2014 @ 12:03 pm PDT

So obviously, this was BS.

Michael Z. Williamson
19th July, 2014 @ 07:39 am PDT
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