Photokina 2014 highlights
High Line at the Rail Yards is the third and northernmost section of the High Line to be o...

The third section of New York's iconic High Line was opened at the weekend. The High Line is a 1.45 mile (2.33 km) long public park created on an old raised rail freight line. Following the opening of the High Line at the Rail Yards, it now stretches from Gansevoort Street to West 34th Street.  Read More

The Starwars House, by South Korean architecture firm Moon Hoon (Photo: Namgoong Sun)

The force is strong in South Korea. Local architecture firm Moon Hoon has built a Star Wars-inspired home that would look at home on a George Lucas movie set. The Starwars House was constructed for a family of four on a relatively low budget and shows a sense of fun while remaining a practical family home.  Read More

The adhesive material developed at MIT is based on mussel foot proteins and retains its st...

Clingy barnacles might be something of a nuisance for seafarers, but these stubborn shellfish and their relatives could hold the key to a new breed of sticky materials. Engineers from MIT have created waterproof adhesives based on the proteins that give these creatures such qualities, a development that could one day be used in ship repairs or medical applications.  Read More

The discovery of an on/off switch for telomerase could provide a way to get human cells to...

Researchers at the Salk Institute have discovered an on/off switch for telomerase, an enzyme that rebuilds a cellular timekeeper known as a telomere. The scientists believe that the discovery could provide a way to get human cells to divide indefinitely without degenerating, thereby regenerating healthy organs even in old age.  Read More

With US$15 million up for grabs, XPrize is hoping to inspire a revolutionary set of educat...

Having tasked technologists with challenges as diverse as Ted Talkin' artificial intelligence and bringing Star Trek's iconic tricorder to life, XPrize has now turned its attention to an equally ambitious task. Millions of children around the globe don't have basic literacy skills, presenting a problem that cannot be solved without some big picture thinking. Launching today, the Global Learning XPrize offers US$15 million in prize money for the development of software that teaches children these vital skills in the space of 18 months, without the presence of a teacher.  Read More

Crystals which contain the information of light after the teleportation (Photo: GAP, Unive...

A successful test in passing information from light into matter – using the teleportation of the quantum state of a photon via optical fiber cable to a receiving crystal located over 25 km (15 mi) away – has been claimed by physicists at the University of Geneva. This test shattered the same team’s previous record and may herald the development of greater, long-distance teleportation techniques and qubit communications and computing capabilities.  Read More

John Kundzins of the Kidney Research Institute in Seattle models the Wearable Artificial K...

In 2009, we had a look at the Wearable Artificial Kidney (WAK) concept that promised patients suffering from kidney failure an alternative to conventional dialysis. Now the tool-belt sized prototype has been granted approval for human testing in the United States by the FDA with clinical trials scheduled to take place in Seattle later this year.  Read More

The Qimini Deuce aims to make wireless charging portable

Wireless charging is still a relatively new technology in the portable electronics arena, but it is rapidly gaining steam. As a result, plenty of companies are embracing it and making use of it in creative ways. Once such firm is Qimini, which is launching a wireless charging device called Deuce that also features its own battery packed in its tiny form factor, allowing it to charge devices without wires while on the go.  Read More

Students at Cal Poly Pamona have reimagined the state park cabin

Students at California Polytechnic Pomona have been reinterpreting the cabins used by visitors to US state parks as part of a program by the Architecture Department Studio. Revamp the Camp aimed to make the cabins in California State Parks cheaper and greener, as well as more appealing to a wider range of park users.  Read More

A cut-away view of a car door with the Slamstop device installed At some point or another, you've probably half-heartedly swung your car's passenger door closed, only to see the "door ajar" light come on once you're on the road. In some cases, this can even result in the door swinging open while driving. Slamming the doors shut is one option, although Slamstop is designed to be a quieter alternative.  Read More

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