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— Health & Wellbeing

Hyperice aims to create a buzz with new muscle-loosening sphere

As most serious athletes will know, one of the keys to avoiding muscle cramps involves loosening up the soft tissues both before and after intense physical activity. While there are already balls and rollers that let people do so, Hyperice's new Hypersphere adds another dimension – its core vibrates at a high frequency, reportedly getting those muscles and tendons as loose as a goose.

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— Automotive

Peugeot's Traveler i-Lab imagines the future of business shuttles

Peugeot is using the upcoming Geneva International Auto Show to offer the world its vision of what a highly-connected business shuttle could look like in the not-too-distant future. Positioned as a concept vehicle based on the Peugeot Traveler that will debut at the same show, the Traveler i-Lab is heavy on technology that complies with the needs of today's business traveler.

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— Medical

Brazil starts screening transfusion blood for Zika virus

As the mosquito-borne Zira virus monopolizes the attention of Brazil's government and media, adding to the burden of the dengue epidemic, researchers are offering a method to blood banks that wish to screen transfusion blood for pregnant women and in cases of intrauterine transfusion. There is a suspicion that Zika could cause foeatuses to develop microcephaly, a condition in which babies are born with small heads and brains.

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— Medical

Odoreader accurately detects prostate cancer from urine

Standard prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests for prostate cancer are far from ideal, sometimes resulting in unnecessary biopsies, and even failing to detect some cancers altogether. With the goal of developing a more capable alternative, a team of researchers has turned to a machine it calls the Odoreader, which is designed to analyze urine samples to provide a non-invasive prostate cancer test.

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— Music

T8 puts music creation at your fingertips

Tapping out rhythms with your fingers can help relieve boredom in the workplace or each hit could sound out some must-dance-to electronica, depending on whether you're using a desk or a pad controller. Like Onyx Ashanti's impressive Beatjazz Hands, the T8 from Remidi puts wireless control of digital music in the hands of the performer, but without all those bulky 3D-printed components. The system comprises a sensor-packed glove and a tech-filled wristband that wirelessly connects to a laptop or mobile device running music creation software.

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