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— Science

Imaging tool lets scientists look inside brain at nanoscale resolution

By - August 1, 2015 5 Pictures

The human brain contains more synapses than there are galaxies in the observable universe (to put a number on it, there are perhaps 100 trillion synapses versus 100 billion galaxies), and now scientists can see them all – individually. A new imaging tool promises to open the door to all sorts of new insights about the brain and how it works. The tool can generate images at a nanoscale resolution, which is small enough to see all cellular objects and many of their sub-cellular components (so for the biology-literate, that's stuff like neurons and the synapses that permit them to fire, plus axons, dendrites, glia, mitochondria, blood vessel cells, and so on).

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— Automotive

Vitesse AuDessus releases ultralight carbon fiber sports car wheels

By - August 1, 2015 14 Pictures

Just a month after announcing its entry into the bespoke automotive aftermarket, Maryland-based carbon fiber atelier Vitesse AuDessus (that's "Superior Speed" in French) has introduced a new carbon fiber wheel. The hollow, single-piece wheel appears quite similar in design to the Aircore wheel that Koenigsegg uses on its Agera R and One:1 hypercars, only this wheel can lighten and liven everything from Lamborghinis, to McLarens, to Porsches, assuming the owner is willing to drop the price of an Audi A4 to get a set.

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— Health and Wellbeing

Low-cost prosthetic knee could let the impoverished walk normally

By - July 31, 2015 3 Pictures

Some higher-end prosthetic legs are equipped with things like gyroscopes and accelerometers, in order to guide their knee joint through a more natural bending motion. In developing nations, however, such expensive prostheses usually aren't an option. That's why a scientist from MIT is developing a knee that could allow inexpensive legs to perform like the fancy ones.

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— Space

Brown dwarf aurora may help characterize distant exoplanets

By - July 31, 2015 2 Pictures

The discovery of a powerful aurora surrounding a distant failed star may in future aid astronomers in their hunt for habitable planets. The aurora is the first to be discovered around a brown dwarf, known as LSRJ 1835+3259 (LSRJ). It's a type of star that shares many characteristics with known exoplanets, and the technique used to observe the phenomenon could one day be a factor in determining whether a planet could sustain life.

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