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WaterMill provides energy-efficient alternative to bottled H2O

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October 20, 2008

The WaterMill is designed for home use, producing up to 12 liters (13 US quarts) of water ...

The WaterMill is designed for home use, producing up to 12 liters (13 US quarts) of water each day

October 21, 2008 The WaterMill from ElementFour creates clean drinking water for your home using only air. The device draws in air through a filter and passes it over a cooling element where it is condensed into water droplets. The water is then collected, passed through a specialized carbon filter and then exposed to an ultraviolet sterilizer to eliminate bacteria. Once the drinking water is ready for consumption, it is fed into your designated point of use: directly to your sink, an existing bottled water system, your refrigerator, or a custom dispenser.

The WaterMill produces up to 12 liters (13 US quarts) of water each day – enough water for a family to drink and cook with.

The system is installed outside your home and uses outside air as the air inside your home is up to 70 times more polluted. Additionally, it means you won't dry out the air you breathe in your home. The filtration system cleans the water of bacteria and toxins, making the WaterMill suitable to be used even in high density cities with not-so-clean air.

Designed to minimize energy use, the system produces one liter of water for around three to four cents. In comparison, bottled water systems typically cost around 10 cents per liter or more. The control system also enables the WaterMill to adapt to changing conditions in every climate by automatically adjusting airflow to maximize water production, while minimizing power consumption. Water production is constantly monitored and controlled and the display shows the temperature, humidity and water production. It even tells you when it’s time for service.

Other applications for the WaterMill include supplying water for disaster relief and scalable systems for agricultural and commercial use.

Via: Inhabitat.

2 Comments

Very good for developing countries in providing clean and safe drinking water. It will be a boon for remote areas.

Dr.A.Jagadeesh Nellore(AP),India

Dr.A.Jagadeesh
2nd May, 2010 @ 07:40 am PDT

Holly crap ! What a long way around to getting water..... Waste of money and time unless you are in the desert and or in the Chilean Andes where there is no water at all. And then you have to clean it and filter it and replace the filters. Etc. GIMIC not a GIZMO.

Buy LED light bulbs and save more money on a lower investment.

Erwin Lapschies
22nd October, 2011 @ 09:33 am PDT
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