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Vuzix display Wrap 920AR augmented reality glasses

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January 12, 2010

Playing a maze game designed by a PHD student from Columbia University using the Vizux Wra...

Playing a maze game designed by a PHD student from Columbia University using the Vizux Wrap 920AR glasses

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Forget looking at the world through rose colored glasses – try these on for size. Video eyewear manufacturer Vuzix has unveiled its Wrap 920AR glasses prototype that features cameras mounted to the lenses that project real world images onto LCD’s inside the glasses, seamlessly mixing real-world and computer generated imagery.

The glasses incorporate a camera on each lens that captures video at a resolution of 752x480 at 60fps offering a combined image of 1504x480 which can also be viewed in stereoscopic 3D. The cameras project real-world imagery onto LCD’s inside the glasses that give the effect of watching a 67” display from ten feet away. The images are overlaid with computer generated imagery effectively creating an augmented reality.

Aside from obvious uses like gaming, the Wrap 920AR has the potential to be harnessed for education, with books “coming alive” with overlaid information, or virtual city guides, whereby a user wearing the glasses can look down a street and see particular restaurants featured. Social networking could take on a whole new level also, with users able to find “air tags” left by friends when looking at a particular street scene.

Each camera has a 1/3 of an inch wide VGA image sensor and the unit also includes a 6 Degree-of-Freedom Tracker which allows for absolute accuracy of roll pitch and yaw. Vuzix is planning on a release some time in Q2 of 2010 priced at around US$800, with high resolution versions currently being used by the military also in the pipeline.

Check out the pics below of Gizmag giving the Wrap 920AR a go, playing a maze game developed by a PHD student from Columbia University.

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4 Comments

I've been predicting the development of SEE-THRU, 3D CAMERA/PROJECTOR, VISUAL DISPLAY GLASSES (and boring all my friends and acquaintances) for ages, simply because they are the logical next most needed/wanted improvement in interface technology, and the technology is clearly reaching the point where they are viable. So far, however, the developers themselves don't appear to see the real significance and potential of this future-tech gear.

I PREDICT NOW THAT THIS WILL BE THE MOST IMPORTANT DEVELOPMENT IN HUMAN COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY SINCE THE MOBILE PHONE.

Just think about it... It will potentially allow the transfer of one person's 3D audio-visual experience DIRECTLY to another person, OR ANY NUMBER OF OTHER PEOPLE (who also has/have the equipment), anywhere on the planet!!!!

As with the internet so far (and most other important new technologies), this will open up extraordinary, infinite and unimaginable new possibilities, both good and bad, and will similarly be driven to a large extent by YouTube and the porn industry!

Of course the other most significant advantages* of these gadgets are that:

(*unless you manufacture display screens)

a) they will use a fraction of the power of conventional TVs and VDUs and require a fraction of the production energy/resourses

b) you can carry them in a small pocket

c) they free you from the desktop and are hands-free

Finally, I predict two related likely developments:

1) a one-handed cordless Numchuck-type control to interact with the display

2) a completely hands-free eye verbal interface system

technut
13th January, 2010 @ 06:09 am PST

I agree completely ,except the nunchuck handheld unit will also have projector capabilities to display to others the content on the glasses or for presentations.

jamescornwell77
13th January, 2010 @ 09:40 pm PST

Good thinking, Batman

technut
14th January, 2010 @ 06:56 pm PST

Combine this with Emotiv's mind reading headset and you're good to go!

emotiv.com

Facebook User
14th January, 2010 @ 10:30 pm PST
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