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Varley evR-450 Electric Supercar set for 2012 launch

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December 13, 2011

The Varley evR-540 electric supercar will arrive in January 2012

The Varley evR-540 electric supercar will arrive in January 2012

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Australia has a new home-grown electric supercar. The recently announced Varley evR-540 is handbuilt around an aluminum monocoque chassis and powered by locally developed and engineered twin Carbon ironless core AC motors with Tritium Wavesculptor inverters claimed to be up to 95% efficient. The performance of this lightweight 2-seat mid-engine coupe is impressive - it's capable of accelerating from from zero to 100 km/h (62 mph) in 3.8 seconds and can reach a top speed of 180 km/h (112 mph), which puts it in the same league as the Tesla Roadster).

While the evR450 is expected to be available soon, Varley Electric Vehicles will initially be taking orders for a sport variant, the evS450, in January 2012. Although similar to the evR, the evS450 has a slightly lower spec. with top speed of 160 km/h (99 mph) and 0-100 km time of 4.6 seconds.

Varley evS450 and evR450

"We wanted to give our customers the option of a sport version as not everyone is comfortable with a race-spec car for day-to-day driving. Drivers will have access to 24kWh of battery energy, enabling them to travel up to 160 kilometers (100 miles - combined cycle) before having to recharge," said John Bettini, Manager of the Electric Vehicles Division.

The car can be recharged in eight hours using a standard 15-amp power point. Faster charging capabilities will appear in future products when available.

"Motorists today tend to drive less than 40 kilometres per day, so 160 kilometres range will be plenty for most drivers. Those wanting to take the evR for a Sunday joy ride should have no trouble driving for a few hours."

Pricing for the Varley evS450 is expected to be under AUD200,000 (US$200,000).

Varley evS450 and evR450 key specs:

  • Configuration: 2-seat mid-engine coupe
  • Chassis: Tig welded aluminium semi-monocoque with integral space frame
  • Roll Cage: 6 point seamless race spec
  • Doors: Scissor opening
  • Acceleration 0-100km/h: 4.6 s (evS450) 3.8 s (evR450)
  • Top Speed: 160 km/h (evS450) 180 km/h (evR450)
  • Range (Combined Cycle): 160 km
  • Battery Pack: 24KWh lithium ion
  • Battery Management: Tritium iqcell
  • Motor Controllers: Twin Tritium Wavesculptor Liquid Cooled 300 amp (evS450), Twin Tritium WaveSculptor Liquid Cooled 350 amp (evR450)
  • Motors: Twin Ultramotive Technologies carbon 3 phase ac ironless with Dynamic Overdrive
  • Peak Power: 280 kW @ 2550 rpm (evS450) 310 kW @ 2420 rpm (evR450)
  • Peak Torque: 1050 Nm @ 0-2550 rpm (evS450) 1225 Nm @ 0-2420 rpm (evS450)
  • Maximum Speed: 4200 rpm 4500 rpm
  • Final Drive: 3.27:1 single speed
  • Calipers: 4 pot brembo front and rear
  • Discs: front: 355 mm ventilated, rear: 365 mm ventilated
  • Wheels: Multi-spoke aluminum Lightweight rotary forged, Stress-relieved aluminum Front: 18 x 9.5, Rear: 19 x 12
  • Dimensions: length: 4267 mm, wheelbase: 2667 mm, width: 1880 mm, height: 1092 mm
  • Curb Weight: 1290 kg 1250 kg
  • ipad-iphone integrated vehicle control system
  • About the Author
    Martin Hone Martin spent 17 years as road and track tester for Australian Motorcycle News and has raced motorcycles for over 40 years, picking up an Australian Championship in 1993 in the Unlimited Class Historic. An aircraft builder and experienced recreational pilot, he currently operates a test flight and maintenance facility, owns a Ducati 1000 and a Buell 1200 … and writes for Gizmag.   All articles by Martin Hone
    8 Comments

    The base car is the outstanding - and much cheaper - RCR SL-C, a major crush of mine. Kit components come to about $41K without the powertrain. It's basically a GT car for the street.

    RCR is in Michigan: http://superlitecars.com/ So yes, you can get the same car in the states for about a quarter the price of this Aussie version.

    Todd Dunning
    13th December, 2011 @ 07:30 pm PST

    I would rather have a Fisker Karma at US$ 80.000! :P

    Per Lind
    13th December, 2011 @ 08:32 pm PST

    Nice but rediculous. Something a little more practical that doesn't require mortgaging your sons and gandsons would be a far better use of time and effort. Get this technology to the common man instead of just making more toys for the rich.

    Max Kennedy
    14th December, 2011 @ 06:53 am PST

    I can just imagine getting groceries in over a "plateau" of about 2 feet, or for that matter; a wheelchair/walker/crutches. Or perhaps mountain bike racks, or ski racks- since this is pretty clearly a vehicle for young, agile skinny people. But different horses for different courses- marginal uses; whatever! Interesting concept to consider- make more sense to me to hinge the back like a funny car dragster so the entire body raises and anyone could get in.

    Chris Jordan
    14th December, 2011 @ 10:38 am PST

    Yes, yes. Let's complain about things for the rich rather than aspire to be there ourselves.

    Daryl Sonnier
    14th December, 2011 @ 02:27 pm PST

    Warmed over McLaren GT shaped design.

    Gregg Eshelman
    14th December, 2011 @ 08:25 pm PST

    Although the 0-62mph in 3.8 seconds acceleration would be invigorating, 112mph top speed is at best 82mph slower than what is now commonly held as super car domain. I fully appreciate the low end performance for this generation of EVs, but as long as the comparison is apples to cherry tomatoes the gas fueled i.c.e. will dominate not just the imagination, but the road as well. The Varley evR-540, like the Tesla Roadster, is a wonderful sports car, but until it can go as fast (top end) as far (per on board energy load) as the typical Ferrari or Lamborgini, they can not and should not be called super cars. Let's be honest in our advertising and much less disappointment will result, they are quick sports cars. I'm not knocking the cars, they are sweet, I'm knocking the marketing.

    Grei Walker
    14th December, 2011 @ 09:25 pm PST

    You're just wasting fuel the faster you go anyway because drag increases exponentially the faster you drive; it simply takes more fuel to power the car.

    Let's face it, sports care were never meant to be practical, if you want to go faster with less fuel and effort just fly a small plane.

    SpaceBagels
    15th December, 2011 @ 04:21 am PST
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