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US$15 Pogo Sketch turns MacBook Trackpad into pen tablet

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December 23, 2008

December 24, 2008 It’s not often we report about potentially disruptive technology in a US$15 package, but that’s the way we see the Pogo Sketch. Made specifically for use with the newest MacBook multi-touch trackpad, the stylus is claimed to transform the notebook into a pen tablet for premium drawing programs and artistic applications. Without trying it, we can’t be sure it’s the real deal, but we acknowledge the massive potential of adding tablet functionality to any computer for just US$14.95. We recently raved about Ten One Design’s Pogo Stylus for the iPhone and iPod touch which uses the same special conductive tip to transfer the signal from the user’s hand to the capacitive touch screen display. Indeed, the Pogo Sketch can also be used on an iPhone and iPod touch too, so it’s potentially a game changer in our humble opinion.

“The Pogo Sketch is the ultimate tool for artists who want to turn their MacBook trackpads into canvases for artistic expression,” said Peter Skinner, Ten One Design CEO. “Apple is always continuing to innovate and surprise the tech world, and with our new products, we can provide the user with even more versatility.”

The new Pogo Sketch also works with the iPhone and iPod touch like its predecessor, the Pogo Stylus, which gives the user greater efficiency and accuracy when typing and navigating their handheld devices. And people with longer fingernails or larger fingers no longer experience gadget envy from not being able to use capacitive touch screens. The Pogo Sketch easily glides across the trackpad and even keeps it free of smudges and grease.

For added portability, the Pogo Sketch features a cool pocket clip, securing it in place for on-the-go travel. The ultra-light aluminum body with a matte anodized silver finish could be one of the big success stories of 2009.

Our bet is that if people begin experiencing the advantages of using a tablet with their portable machine, more of them will shell out the money for a Wacom tablet when they're at the desktop.

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About the Author
Mike Hanlon Mike grew up thinking he would become a mathematician, accidentally started motorcycle racing, got a job writing road tests for a motorcycle magazine while at university, and became a writer. As a travelling photojournalist during his early career, his work was published in a dozen languages across 20+ countries. He went on to edit or manage over 50 print publications, with target audiences ranging from pensioners to plumbers, many different sports, many car and motorcycle magazines, with many more in the fields of communication - narrow subject magazines on topics such as advertising, marketing, visual communications, design, presentation and direct marketing. Then came the internet and Mike managed internet projects for Australia's largest multimedia company, Telstra.com.au (Australia's largest Telco), Seek.com.au (Australia's largest employment site), top100.com.au, hitwise.com, and a dozen other internet start-ups before founding Gizmag in 2002. Now he writes and thinks. All articles by Mike Hanlon
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