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Along comes a spider - UREWERK UR103T watch

By

June 24, 2009

UREWERK UR103T watch

UREWERK UR103T watch

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URWERK hasn't done anything to damage its reputation for avant-garde timepieces with its latest addition to the UR103 range. The UR103T keeps time by means of four rotating satellites that sweep past the minute arc at the bottom of the face and a "control board" on the back includes a 43-hour power reserve indicator and a chronometer for accurate time-setting. Anyone who can guess what the "t" designates deserves a prize - it's not "titanium" or "timepiece", but "tarantula", a reference to the arachnid inspired aesthetics of the watch mechanism.

Each of the four satellites on the rotating cross mechanism make a complete revolution of the dial every four hours and each carries three numbers which also rotate.

The engineering challenge in creating the unique mechanism was to cope with the weight and minimizing friction of of the rotating satellites, each being more than 300 times heavier than a traditional hand. For this task, master watchmaker and co-founder of URWERK Felix Baumgartner chose precisely crafted aluminum for its strength and lightness. Bronze/beryllium and a light, non-magnetic and corrosion resistant material known as ARCAP 40 are also used in the construction of the mechanism.

    UR103T technical specifications:
  • Case: Stainless steel treated with AlTiN (Aluminium, Titanium, Nitride)
  • Dimensions: 50mm x 36mm x 13.5mm (including lugs)
  • Movement: Calibre 3.03; manual winding; 21,600bph/3Hz
  • Power reserve 43 hours
  • Triple bridges in black ARCAP P40
  • Time Indication by hour satellites rotated by Geneva crosses
  • Control Board: Grade 5 titanium, power reserve indicator, 15-minute and seconds dials for precise time-setting, user adjustable fine-tuning screw

Via: UREWERK.

About the Author
Noel McKeegan After a misspent youth at law school, Noel began to dabble in tech research, writing and things with wheels that go fast. This bus dropped him at the door of a freshly sprouted Gizmag.com in 2002. He has been Gizmag's Editor-in-Chief since 2007.   All articles by Noel McKeegan
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1 Comment

a bit complicated but amazingggggggggggggggggg!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Mike Szeto
5th June, 2011 @ 11:00 pm PDT
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