Apple announces iPhone 6, Apple Watch

TruLink 1-Port 60GHz WirelessHD Kit aims to cut HDMI cable clutter

By

April 15, 2010

Yet another black box ... the  TruLink WirelessHD kit transmitter can send 1080p signals w...

Yet another black box ... the TruLink WirelessHD kit transmitter can send 1080p signals wirelessly between your TV and HDMI devices

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The TruLink 1-Port 60GHz WirelessHD Kit lets you say goodbye to the clutter of (expensive) HDMI cables and still retain a 1080p signal via a wireless transmission between your television and your HDMI components, Blu-ray player, set-top box, gaming console, etc. Good up to 30ft line-of-sight, the 60GHz transmission capability delivers wireless flexibility in your home theater setup.

The kit includes the wireless transmitter and wireless receiver and is ideally suited where in-wall cabling is either not feasible (such as in plaster, brick or exterior walls) or not desired (such as in apartments or other rental properties).

The TruLink WirelessHD kit promises true uncompressed audio/video transmission in a plug-and-play solution that requires no software, no drivers and no setup – just connect the receiver with the HDMI component and instantly transmit content to your HDMI-enabled television.

An auto power function automatically turns off the attached component when the transmitter is turned off. The wall-mountable transmitter and receiver each have an on/off switch.

The TruLink WirelessHD kit supports 7.1 channnel surround sound, and meets DTCP protocol. It’s compatible with other WiHD-enabled devices as well as HDMI 1.3.

The manufacturers, Cables To Go, advise that to achieve the throughput rates required within the distances stated, the transmitter should not be placed higher than the receiver, both units should face each other in the same room and be located in open spaces, not inside cabinets or behind doors, etc.

The kit weighs 3lbs and sells for US$499.99.

Via CrunchGear.

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1 Comment

I can't wait until they rid themselves of the "line-of-sight" requirement... a lot of us keep our A/V gear inside a cabinet or on shelves to the side of the HDTV....so this won't work. This makes more sense if the gear and the TV are on opposite walls, with line-of-sight, and the cable would have to go through the ceiling or take a long route along the base-board. Ka-ching!

For $500 though, most people would be hard pressed not to be able to pay for a pro to hide the HDMI cables from A/V gear located nearby, even through brick masonry. If there is a way to get a power cable to the television, there is a 99% chance that an HDMI cable could be routed by a professional, and still be invisible.

matthew.rings
15th April, 2010 @ 04:39 pm PDT
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