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Toshiba Dynario - Portable Fuel Cell in your backpack

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December 10, 2009

Toshiba's Dynario portable fuel cell

Toshiba's Dynario portable fuel cell

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Fuel cells are the cleanest and the most efficient generators of energy and now you can have one in your back pack. Dynario, a portable fuel cell power generator recently launched by Toshiba Corporation, weighs just 280 grams, measures only 15cm wide x 2.1cm deep x 7.45cm high and can produce enough power in 20 seconds to charge two mobile phones. The power is stored in in-built lithium ion batteries and can be transferred via a USB cable to your mobile phone or digital media player when needed.

The methanol powered device has a dedicated 50 ml cartridge for refueling. A single cartridge can be used to charge approximately three times.

Compared to other green forms of energy generation like portable solar chargers or micro wind turbines, fuel cells offer a more dependable and reliable option. Power is generated instantly and water is the only emission.

The only drawback of Dynario seems to be cost, which at around US$275 for the fuel cell generator and $30 for 50ml cartridge of methanol is way too expensive for normal use. However, some users of adventure sports who want very small amounts of reliable power to charge up their GPS and other emergency devices will find Dynario very useful despite the costs.

At present Dynario is available for sale only in Japan from Toshiba's e-website.

Via Toshiba.

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7 Comments

This really seems like the right product for the times, I'm just curios as to why I would have to use there fuel? I'm sure just about any kind of methanol would do?

mrhuckfin
11th December, 2009 @ 04:52 am PST

This kind of thing certainly will be handy but please stop suggesting that the only emission is water. Distilling and manufacturing methanol requires energy. People are being misled into thinking this is a carbon neutral fuel.

George
13th December, 2009 @ 12:35 pm PST

@George. One can easily get into circular reasoning on some of these energy items. But it all goes to the foundational method of how the original energy was produced: coal or wind? Natural gas or nuclear? Solar, biogas, or tidal power?

So, an article about how this nifty fuel cell releases only water vapor as a by-product is actually the only thing that can be factually said about this product, in particular.

Your comment that distilling requires "energy" in no way makes any point as to whether that energy is carbon-negative, neutral or positive. That is something on a larger economic and political scale, and should have no impact on whether a particular small fuel cell is carbon-neutral or not.

The original method of energy to power the methanol distillery is what determines the overall life-cycle carbon-neutrality (or not), and makes no impact upon the product's particular usefulness or contribution to carbon-emissions.

matthew.rings
13th December, 2009 @ 05:29 pm PST

Methane conversion through a fuel cell used to charge little devices like a cell phone or PDS is a waste of resources and money. The device its self harnesses nafia to separate the molecules as well as a lithium battery, a device that charges the battery and all these things will be lost once the battery stops accepting a charge or the nafia becomes clogged. Anywhere from 1 to 5 years.

If your in the middle of the ocean or forest they have hand operated devices that produce energy to recharge flashlights and cell phones with the turn of a lever. LCD's to not need much to run efficiently for long periods of time. Cell phones are already becoming available with built in solar panels on the backs of the phone. Solar panels work in sunny and cloudy environments so that would be a more efficient option as well. This device uses newer technology and sounds cool yea, but its not really all that practical considering its uses. I'll bet its not even drop proof yet alone water resistant. Beta version Junk. Keep the made in China logo on it and leave it there.

parlenic
29th December, 2009 @ 02:42 pm PST

If this thing only gives off water-vapour, where does the carbon from the methanol (CH3OH) go?

Adrien
17th June, 2010 @ 09:13 pm PDT

Very Innovative product.

Dr.A.Jagadeesh Nellore(AP),India

Anumakonda Jagadeesh
5th December, 2010 @ 11:22 pm PST

CO2 is also generated, as well as some CO. You could use any methanol I guess but you have to make sure it's within the optimal molarity. Not sure what theirs is, it may be a trade secret but you can figure it out with a little chemistry.

Zachary Chiedu Godisang Nwabudike
23rd January, 2014 @ 07:23 pm PST
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