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Rockochet prevents rocks from tripping up skateboarders

Skateboarding is an inherently dangerous activity. However, just because it's risky to hop on a board doesn't mean the risk of injury can't and shouldn't be decreased. One risk skateboarders face is large rocks that can cause the rider to trip forward. A new device called Rockochet aims to fix that, by sitting in front of the wheels and deflecting rocks away – leading to a safer, smoother ride.  Read More

Researchers have found that the language that the retina uses to communicate with the brai...

Our eyes extract a lot of information from visible light that enables us to see color, movement, shadows, highlights, shapes, and more, with each component processed separately and sent to the brain in parallel to the others. It was previously thought that the same scene would always be converted into the same pattern of activity. But research by scientists at the University of Tübingen in Germany and the University of Manchester in the UK suggests that the signals differ wildly as the brightness of the environment changes by even small amounts.  Read More

The Ukelation electric ukulele from Monty Ross

Back in 2012, Vox Amplification took the iconic shapes of two 1960s classics, installed speakers and added integrated effects and rhythms to create a new Apache Series of travel guitars. Monty Ross from the state of Washington has now given a four-string beach party regular similar "be heard anywhere" amplified superpowers with a range of electric ukuleles named Ukelation.  Read More

Brio can tell the difference between a kid's fingers and an electrical appliance

Most of us have a number of power outlets dotted around the house, and each one is a potential hazard to inquisitive little fingers. Brio promises a safer and smarter power outlet that can tell the difference between a kid's fingers and an electrical appliance, only turning on the juice for the latter.  Read More

3D printing technology has enabled some truly life-changing surgeries in the past year

Though printing items like chocolate and pizza might be satisfying enough for some, 3D printing still holds a lot of unfulfilled potential. Talk abounds of disrupting manufacturing, changing the face of construction and even building metal components in space. While it is hard not to get a little bit excited by these potentially world-changing advances, there is one domain where 3D printing is already having a real-life impact. Its capacity to produce customized implants and medical devices tailored specifically to a patient's anatomy has seen it open up all kinds of possibilities in the field of medicine, with the year 2014 having turned up one world-first surgery after another. Let's cast our eye over some of the significant, life-changing procedures to emerge in the past year made possible by 3D printing technology.  Read More

Gizmag's selection of 2014's most innovative and, in some cases, odd product offerings

The silly season is well and truly upon us again and with it comes the challenge of selecting a suitable gift for tech-loving friends and family. The options are a little overwhelming, but Gizmag's editorial team has sifted through 2014's most innovative and, in some cases, odd product offerings in an effort to help.  Read More

A single molecule made by combining three hormones has been found to effectively cure obes...

In 2012, we covered work led by Professor Richard DiMarchi that showed linking two hormones into a single molecule held promise as a treatment for obesity. DiMarchi followed this up last year by combining the properties of two endocrine hormones to provide an effective treatment for both obesity and adult-onset diabetes. Continuing in this vein, DiMarchi has now co-led a study whereby obesity and diabetes were effectively cured in lab animals by adding a third hormone to the molecular mix.  Read More

The latest findings indicate that the Earth's water may not have come from comets (Image E...

The oceans are a mystery in more ways than one, but you might not expect the answers to come from a pack of electronics and a comet. But that's what the European Space Agency (ESA) says about the unmanned Rosetta probe orbiting comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. Though 67P is making its first visit to the inner Solar System and won't come closer to the Earth than hundreds of millions of miles, it is throwing new light on one of the fundamental questions in Earth's history: Where did the oceans come from?  Read More

A sample of the high-entropy alloy (Photo: North Carolina State University)

When it comes to metal that's being used in the automotive or aerospace industries, the higher its strength-to-weight ratio, the better. With that in mind, researchers from North Carolina State University and Qatar University have developed a new alloy that reportedly has a low density similar to that of aluminum, but that's stronger than titanium.  Read More

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