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Gizmag reviews the LG G Pad 8.3, one of the most comfortable tablets we've held

When you talk about tablets, it's easy to think of the iPads, Galaxy tablets, and Kindle Fires of the world. But what about LG? Though the company's mobile devices may not be household names, we've seen some top-notch hardware from the South Korean electronics giant. Is the LG G Pad 8.3 part of that club? Read on, as we review LG's answer to the iPad mini.  Read More

3D Babies offers 3D-printed figurines of your unborn fetus in three sizes

While some expectant parents are happy to conceal the sex until they see their newborn with their own eyes, others just can't wait. We'd guess that by offering 3D-printed figurines modeled on an ultrasound, 3D Babies is targeting the latter group.  Read More

Nissan at NAIAS 2014

Nissan turned some heads with its fiery-orange Sport Sedan Concept at the North American International Auto Show this week. Previewing a sporty production sedan largely thought to be the next-generation Maxima, the concept shows a bolder future for the Nissan four-door. The SSC was surrounded by several other intriguing concepts and prototypes on Nissan's podium, including two distinctive small sedans and an autonomous research vehicle.  Read More

The Mk1 cargo trike leans like a bike

Cargo trikes may be very practical, but unfortunately they can also be pretty slow and dumpy. This is particularly noticeable when taking corners, as they can can't lean into the turn like a regular bicycle. The designers at Denmark's Butchers & Bicycles, however, have decided to change that, with their Mk1 leaning cargo trike.  Read More

The Lexus RC F debuted at the Detroit Auto Show

Lexus has unveiled the 2015 Lexus RC F at the 2014 North American International Auto Show in Detroit. Building on the sporty image of the RC coupe unveiled in Tokyo last year, the latest iteration of the four-seater, rear-wheel drive compact executive coupé features a 2UR-GSE V8 engine and other refinements to allow for the larger powertrain.  Read More

Eyelock's myris iris-scanning identity authentication device

myris is a new iris-scanning identity authentication device that promises to improve online security for its users and eliminate the need to remember the myriad of different passwords required for our different digital accounts.  Read More

The markerless AR system from Cimagine Media

When you want to augment a digital image creation onto the real world, you'll likely need to point your smart device's camera at the kind of markers found in Sony's TV Size Guide tool or on the front cover of magazines like Esquire. IKEA took this idea a step further by making its 2014 catalog the marker, but a new system from Israel's Cimagine Media uses a tablet or smartphone camera and sensors to position the virtual object in a room without the need for physical markers.  Read More

Artist's concept of Rosetta deploying the Philae lander (Image: ESA)

Like nervous parents, scientists and engineers at ESA are pacing the floor of mission control as they await word of whether or not the Rosetta spacecraft has survived 31 months of hibernation. The unmanned comet chaser was scheduled to reactivate itself today at 10:00 GMT, but the time required to complete the operation and the distance a radio signal must travel back to Earth means that the space agency will not know until at least 17:30 GMT if the probe is operating again or has become deep space scrap.  Read More

Joy Jackets were built as part of Cadbury's 'Joyville' campaign (Photo: Akio-Style)

One of the less practical examples of wearable technology we've seen of late is the "Joy Jacket" – a garment designed to convey a visual statement of happiness when the wearer consumes a certain chocolatier's product.  Read More

A rendering of Prosthesis the Anti-Robot – ready to race (Image: Anti-Robot)

Who wouldn't want to slip into Iron Man's armor or try out the gigantic Jaegers that saved the world in the movie Pacific Rim? Wearable exoskeletons currently being built, from the military-based TALOS, XOS 2 and HULC to rehabilitative models like the ReWalk, MindWalker and X1, all have one thing in common; they are all robotic automated body suits designed to enhance or assist people. Is there a place for a skill-oriented, non-robotic walking exoskeleton, that a person would have to master physically by feel, much like how one might master riding a bicycle or using a skateboard? Jonathan Tippet thinks so. He and his team of volunteers are building Prosthesis, claimed to be the world's first human-piloted racing robot. It's a 5-meter (16-ft) tall behemoth that will rely entirely on the pilot's skill to balance itself or walk or run.  Read More

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