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TomTom unveils new car navigation products

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May 5, 2008

The new TomTom XL

The new TomTom XL

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May 5, 2008 Portable navigation solutions provider TomTom has announced their latest car navigation products – the TomTom ONE and TomTom XL which supersede the current TomTom ONE 3RD EDITION and TomTom ONE XL ranges. The new TomTom ONE comes with a 3.5 inch touch screen LCD, while the TomTom XL boasts a 4.3 inch widescreen LCD, for those who prefer a larger display. The new devices also come with a revised audio system and a completely redesigned body, including a folding mount. This new windshield mount, known as the EasyPort mount, can be left on the device and folded flat after use. The complete unit, including the mount, is then small enough to fit into a shirt pocket, bag or pocket when the driver leaves the vehicle.

The completely revised audio system found in the TomTom ONE and TomTom XL feature a much larger, enhanced speaker system designed so that navigation instructions are louder and clearer, even above outside traffic noise or a car full of excited children. Text-to-speech models are also available on the new devices so that users can hear street names, places, traffic alerts and text messages as part of the spoken instructions.

TomTom’s exclusive ‘Help Me!’ feature gives new TomTom ONE and TomTom XL users direct access to safety and emergency services information with the extensive ‘Help Me!’ menu including information such as emergency and breakdown service numbers, directions to the nearest hospital and car repair service. Advanced safety preferences also allow the user to set their own requirements regarding speed warnings, timed driving breaks and menu accessibility options.

Users of the new range will also benefit from TomTom’s unique Map Share technology, with millions of corrections and improvements uploaded and shared every month by the TomTom online user community of more than 20 million people. These can include changes in street names, road speed limits, turn restrictions, traffic directions and road blocks, as well as corrections to Points of Interest, such as phone numbers changes. The new TomTom ONE and TomTom XL devices can also offer the latest traffic information with an optional RDS-TMC traffic receiver, available for purchase as an accessory.

Technical specifications: TomTom ONE
  • High quality 3.5 inch colour TFT LCD anti-glare touch screen, 4:3 format, QVGA, 320 x 240 pixels, 64k colors
  • Dimensions: 92 x 78 x 25 mm
  • Weight: 148 grams
  • High sensitivity GPS chipset
  • Pre-installed maps on internal memory
  • Connectivity: mini-USB, RDS-TMC (via mini-USB)
  • Internal Lithium-ion battery (up to 3 hours operation)
  • Compatibility: Windows and Mac OS X 10.3 and above
  • Car speed linked volume
  • Enhanced TomTom speaker system
  • EasyPort mount
  • QuickGPSfix
  • Automatic day/night mode
  • Password protection
  • Compatibility with TomTom HOME

Technical specifications: TomTom XL

  • High quality 4.3 inch color TFT LCD anti-glare touch screen, widescreen 16:9 format, WQVGA, 480 x 272 pixels, 64k colors
  • Dimensions: 118 x 83 x 25 mm
  • Weight: 186 grams
  • High sensitivity GPS chipset
  • Pre-installed maps on internal memory
  • Connectivity: mini-USB, RDS-TMC (via mini-USB)
  • Internal Lithium-ion battery (up to 3 hours operation)
  • Compatibility: Windows and Mac OS X 10.3 and above
  • Car speed linked volume
  • Enhanced TomTom speaker system
  • EasyPort mount
  • QuickGPSfix
  • Automatic day/night mode
  • Password protection
  • Compatibility with TomTom HOME

The new TomTom ONE and TomTom XL will be available at retailers this month with the TomTom ONE 130 retailing for USD$199.95 while the TomTom ONE 130S, which includes text-to-speech, retails for $249.95. The widescreen TomTom XL 330 is available for $249.95 and the TomTom XL 330S, which includes text-to-speech, goes for $299.95.

About the Author
Darren Quick Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.   All articles by Darren Quick
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