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Tokyo Flash's trippiest watch ever: Kisai Wasted

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October 28, 2010

The Tokyo Flash Kisai Wasted watch

The Tokyo Flash Kisai Wasted watch

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As crazy as most of Tokyo Flash's watches are, the company just might have set a new standard with the a new psychedelic design, appropriately dubbed the Kisai Wasted. With a hypnotic multi-colored array of LED lights on the face, this latest watch is sure to be a hit (no pun intended) with the stoner demographic.

Like previous Kisai watches, it's far from obvious at first glance exactly how to decipher the time. The diagram below is a much needed illustration of how to crack the Kisai code, as it explains that the hours are on the outside perimeter like on any normal clock, with groups of five minutes on the inside, and single minutes in the center.

Tokyo Flash's trippiest watch ever: Kisai Wasted

To bring up the display, just press the button and let the light show begin. It's probably for the best that the face of the watch is not continuously flashing the time, as it would be a little distracting and a significant power drain as well. In addition, there is an animation mode for use at night that will light up the briefly at 15 minutes intervals.

Just like people, watches have no business being lit up all the time...

The Kisai Wasted comes in two varieties, black and white. It's made from plastic and the strap can be adjusted to a minimum of 10cm (3.9") to a maximum of 20cm (7.9"). It has a rechargeable and replaceable battery, and can also be connected to your PC via USB cable when it's low on juice.

If you'd like to get Wasted, it will set you back 6900 yen in Japan, or about US$85.

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1 Comment

LED watches that only light when a button is pressed? Wow. How very mid 1970's.

Facebook User
8th November, 2010 @ 04:54 pm PST
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