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Telecommunications


— Telecommunications

Spam on the Menu at ITU TELECOM WORLD 2006

December 7, 2006 China's booming markets and the explosion in high-speed networks globally are creating plenty of optimism at the ITU Telecom World 2006 in Hong Kong this week. Mobile phones and wireless networks now reach about one-third of humanity as worldwide, about 215 million consumers use some sort of broadband network to retrieve content on the Internet, while 60 million subscribers, mostly in Asia, use mobile broadband networks. It is the first time that ITU Telecom World is not held in Geneva, Switzerland, reflecting Asia's strong market potential. One of the highlights of this year’s ITU Telecom World 2006 is a one day event being held tomorrow entitled "Countering Spam Cooperation Agenda". Key international and regional organizations invoIved in the fight against spam will gather to discuss greater collaborative efforts to combat spam and related threats. Read More
— Telecommunications

Revolabs Solo Tabletop Wireless Boundary Microphone

December 5, 2006 The world is changing rapidy with remote workers now the norm in many companies, and the enterprise collaboration industry on the rise thanks to fear of flying and productivity benefits on offer. But while virtual meetings are a great idea, they’re not quite there yet with the audio component of high-end conferencing systems – participants on the far end hear extraneous ambient noises while those on the near end are tethered to a central device, limiting mobility and natural meeting dynamics. Revolabs was founded in 2005 with a mission to develop, produce and market secure wireless microphone systems that seamlessly integrate with professional conferencing solutions. The company’s latest announcement is a wireless boundary microphone. The new Solo Tabletop Wireless Boundary Microphone is designed for conference rooms and collaborative spaces and offers an unprecedented level of freedom to room layout and design. Read More
— Telecommunications

Free Service lets children call Santa Claus directly

November 16, 2006 One of the more curious aspects of the Christmas celebration is the custom of telling children their gifts come from Santa Claus. Apart from setting the precedent of telling mistruths to one’s loved ones at a time when they are establishing their value systems, setting up an inevitable and, for some, quite fundamental disillusionment (school children can be so cruel), the premise of a Santa wishlist indicates that Christmas is about receiving rather than its true message which is about giving. All that said, many parents still encourage their children to do the “Santa, I want one of these, and one of these, and …” letter and now there’s a service which enables children to connect to Santa and do it all via telephone. Remarkably, the service then sends the message in .WAV format via email to said child's parents so they can save it forever along with other keepsakes, and even more remarkably it’s FREE. How can such a service be free of charge? That’s the really clever bit. The company that built the system offers a business service of a similar ilk that enables any company to have a virtual presence and phone number in any country. Telsanta is just a clever way of helping you find out about them - give that marketing man a medal! Read More
— Telecommunications

Hawaiian earthquake emphasizes value of text messages in emergencies

October 17, 2006 RU OK? In the crush to communicate with family and friends after the weekend's 6.7 earthquake on the Richter Scale in Hawaii, sending text messages proved to be a quick, efficient way to communicate, according to Verizon Wireless. In the aftermath of earthquakes, hurricanes and floods, voice call traffic rises exponentially. In fact, call volume on the Verizon Wireless network in Hawaii increased 250% over a normal Sunday during the height of the emergency. Text message volume also soared and given the low stress nature of text messaging on the network, Verizon has offered some emergency wireless communications tips which are worth a read. 1 - Maintain a list of emergency phone numbers in your phone. 2 - Have additional charged batteries and car-charger adapters available for back-up power 3 - Forward your home phone calls to your wireless number if you have to evacuate 4 - Limit non-emergency calls to conserve battery power and free-up wireless networks for emergency agencies and operations 5 - Send brief text messages rather than making voice calls for the same reasons. They’re all logical, so it might be worth passing them on. Read More
— Telecommunications

Wireless, wired, VOIP, Power over Ethernet, all in one box

October 6, 2006 Wait, before your eyes glaze over because it looks like just another box destined for the IT department, it’s significant and a signpost to the future as it combines all of the components necessary for wireless and wired Data Access and VoIP networking, all in one box. 3Com announced the unified switch for small and medium businesses (SMBs) earlier this week and apart from converging wired and wireless networking functionality it also includes Power over Ethernet (PoE) to support Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) telephony. The 3Com Unified Gigabit Wireless PoE Switch 24 is easy to deploy and manage solution and it’s cost-effective and designed for SMBs that want all of the elements of a business-class network, as well as a platform for delivering advanced communications solutions such as wireless and VoIP, in one box. No really, it is significant!! Read More
— Telecommunications

New optical fibre data transmission record

October 2, 2006 Sometimes you need to have a physical reference to fully comprehend how big, fast or remarkable a certain achievement is, and that’s exactly the case with the truly astounding achievement of Japanese telco Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation when it successfully demonstrated optical fibre transmission of 14 Tera bits per second over a single 160 km long optical fibre. For those who don’t know, the word Tera signifies one trillion and … you see, hard to wrap the brain cells around what that really means isn’t it. It’s why Apple talks about the iPod in terms of the number of tunes it holds. Then try this for size! That’s 140 high-definition movies per second, waaay ahead of the old record of 100 hi-def movies per second. Clearly we’re going to have enough bandwidth for high res anything a few decades from now. Read More
— Telecommunications

The first universal television program

October 2, 2006 Saturday (September 30, 2006) was an important day in the history of television as it saw the first universal television broadcast. The first satellite TV transmission took place in July 1962 when images of U.S. Vice President Lyndon Bain Johnson were beamed to Britain and France via the satellite Telstar. Similarly, the first global TV broadcast happened on June 25 1967 when the European Broadcasting Union produced the live two-hour international satellite television production Our World for a global television audience of 500 million, most of whom had tuned in to see the live performance by the Beatles who performed All you need is love. Cosmic Connexion was conceived by channel Arte and is the first universal television programme addressing all of the inhabitants of the cosmos. And what did they see? Two nude human presenters who explained how the human body was created, the main elements of daily human life and conveyed messages from humans to an extra terrestrial audience of hopefully, more than zero. The programme was simultaneously transmitted into space by a French National Centre for Space Studies (CNES) antenna. Read More
— Telecommunications

Bluetooth conference phone

September 29, 2006 Polycom has released a new VoiceStation conference phone featuring Bluetooth. Designed for smaller meeting rooms and executive offices, the VoiceStation 500 conference phone is 33 per cent smaller than other Polycom models, and leverages Polycom's Acoustic Clarity Technology for full duplex, natural group conferencing that minimises background echoes, word clipping and distortion to provide a high-quality voice conferencing experience. Read More
— Telecommunications

Near Space system improves battlefield communications

August 31, 2006 The U.S. Air Force Space Command Space & Missile Systems Center's Development and Test Wing has announced a significant investment in Space Data Corporation’s near space communications system. Offering an important improvement in battlefield communications, the system has been extensively tested by the Air Force Space Battlelab over the past two years. The Space Data system utilizes a balloon-borne platform that takes advantage of the very predictable winds in near space to position communications equipment 20 miles above the earth. The Battlelab tests included using the same tactical radios carried by troops in Iraq and Afghanistan. The results showed that ground-to-ground voice and data communications could be extended from 10 miles to over 400 miles. Read More
— Telecommunications

The Wireless PHONEJack – now any telecom device can go wireless

August 14, 2006 We’re predicting that Danish company RTX’s new wireless phone jack is going to be a huge best seller. The Wireless PHONEJack provides a simple, cost effective method for getting a phone line to where it is needed. The Wireless PHONEJack has two main applications, firstly in providing a phone line extension where there is no phone socket and secondly in enabling remote phones to connect to VoIP ATAs. Once connected the Wireless PHONEJack creates a 50 meters radius wireless phone network using DECT radio technology. This allows a user to connect an analogue phone device such as a phone, answering machines, fax or conference phone wirelessly to a PSTN line or VoIP ATA. The Wireless PHONEJack can wirelessly connect up to 4 separate phones within a 50 meter radius of the ATA, making VoIP calls a reality not just from near the ATA but elsewhere in the home or office. Likewise a user can connect up to 4 phone devices to a PSTN phone line without the need to run cables to places where they want the phones without the need to run expensive and messy cables. And installation is easy - it takes less than one minute to plug the Wireless PHONEJack into a power point near an existing phone line and set up it up to route phone calls. The Wireless Phone Jack is available from in Europe (EUR65), Australia (AUD$100) and the United States (US$90) immediately. Read More
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