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Telecommunications


— Telecommunications

Microsoft's undersea data center uses the ocean to keep its cool

Although many people may think that cloud computing exists purely in cyberspace, it does in fact have a physical home – data centers located around the world, each one full of linked servers. These data centers use a lot of power, they create a lot of heat, and it helps if they're close to populated areas. While we've already seen some creative approaches to meeting these needs, Microsoft recently announced that it's tried something else yet … it anchored an unmanned data center to the bottom of the sea.

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— Telecommunications

Mitsubishi's SeaAerial turns fountains into antennae

When someone mentions a radio aerial, it tends to conjure up a vision of something made of steel and wire. But what about one made of water? On Thursday, the Mitsubishi Electric Corporation unveiled its SeaAerial, which uses a column of seawater sprayed into the air to create a radio transceiver antenna. Designed for use at sea or offshore, it's billed as the world's first seawater antenna capable of receiving digital terrestrial broadcasts.

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— Telecommunications

Wi-FM uses local radio stations to improve Internet speeds

Wi-Fi connections are great when they work quickly and efficiently, but when they suddenly slow down inexplicably it can be very frustrating. Surprisingly, this isn't usually caused by a slow connection from your ISP, rather it occurs when two physically close Wi-Fi connections interfere with each other. Now researchers from the McCormick School of Engineering at Northwestern University have come up with a simple way to prevent this – and improve Wi-Fi speeds – by using Frequency Modulation (FM) and a smart time-sharing system that maximizes data throughput.

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Google Fiber poised for move into Silicon Valley

The center of the online universe may finally get the Internet speeds you’d expect it to have. According to reports from the San Jose Mercury News, Google is seeking permission from San Jose officials to build two "fiber huts," the first major step in bringing its 1 gigabit-per-second Google Fiber to the city. It would be the largest city, and the first in California, to so far offer the lightning-fast fiber optic Internet service.

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