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Women

In an effort to increase awareness of nutritional requirements, and to bring simple tech into complex customs, a medical foundation in India has joined forces with a Singaporean ad agency. The plan is to combat iodine deficiencies using bindis, the decorative forehead dots worn by most Indian women and girls. Read More

The Leoht Tote could put an end to rummaging in the depths of your handbag for your phone, only to discover the battery is almost dead. Dubbed "the evolution of the handbag" it comes with in-built lithium ion battery and LED lighting, two USB ports and wireless recharging capabilities – and it looks good, too. Read More

According to a recent University of Portsmouth study, almost one in five women avoid exercise because of breast-related problems, such as pain, embarrassment about excessive breast bounce and not being able to find the right sports bra. That’s around 20 percent of women who may be missing out on the health benefits of physical activity. Fortunately, help is on the way in the form of the Bionic Bra, which quickly adjusts to breast movement, providing more – or less – support as required. Read More

Omate’s latest smartwatch rides the circular display wave of the LG G Watch R and Moto 360, but offers a design aimed specifically at women. Compatible with both iOS and Android, the new wearable is fashion accessory first, smartwatch second. Read More

According to the American Association of University Women (AAUW), less than 1 percent of high school girls in the US see computer science as part of their future. Google is seeking to increase this figure with a scheme aimed at inspiring girls to code. Made With Code includes coding projects, resources and support. Read More
A new procedure promises to lift and support women's breasts with better-lasting results than traditional methods. The Orbix Breast Support System uses thin silicone straps attached to the ribs to provide support. Orbix says the technique "eliminates breast re-sagging and minimizes scarring." Read More
Not so long ago, self health monitoring was largely limited to weighing ourselves to see how a diet was going and sticking a thermometer under our tongue to see if we were getting sick. For everything else we went to the family doctor. That was in the past. Technology has put health and fitness monitoring firmly in consumers’ hands. Starting with pedometers in the 1980s and progressing to the myriad wearable fitness trackers flooding the market today. The grip has just tightened again with Cue – a device that allows users to run medical diagnostics from the comfort of their own home. Read More

In one of the more absurd examples of wearable technology we've seen lately, a Japanese firm has created a high-tech bra called the True Love Tester that literally snaps open only when it senses that the woman is in love. Read More

According to UNAIDS, a member of the United Nations Development Group, 58 percent of people living with HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa are women. Although preventative drugs and condoms do block the transmission of HIV, neither are always practical, available or affordable in developing nations. Help could be on its way, however, in the form of an anti-HIV intravaginal ring that is worn continuously for up to 30 days. Read More
While condoms are the only things that protect against both unwanted pregnancies and HIV, a lot of people aren’t big fans of stopping to put them on. Additionally, women are sometimes put in an awkward role, needing to pressure the man to use the thing – although female condoms certainly do exist, their bulkiness makes them rather unpopular. Now, however, a team of scientists from the University of Washington are working on a type of dissolvable fabric that could be used by women both for contraception and HIV protection. Read More
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