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Women

Google's new Made With Code initiative hopes to encourage more women and girls to take up ...

According to the American Association of University Women (AAUW), less than 1 percent of high school girls in the US see computer science as part of their future. Google is seeking to increase this figure with a scheme aimed at inspiring girls to code. Made With Code includes coding projects, resources and support.  Read More

Orbix is offering a new type of breast-lift procedure that supposedly offers better-lastin...

A new procedure promises to lift and support women's breasts with better-lasting results than traditional methods. The Orbix Breast Support System uses thin silicone straps attached to the ribs to provide support. Orbix says the technique "eliminates breast re-sagging and minimizes scarring."  Read More

Cue examines a droplet of saliva or blood to calculate a digital measurement of your healt...

Not so long ago, self health monitoring was largely limited to weighing ourselves to see how a diet was going and sticking a thermometer under our tongue to see if we were getting sick. For everything else we went to the family doctor. That was in the past. Technology has put health and fitness monitoring firmly in consumers’ hands. Starting with pedometers in the 1980s and progressing to the myriad wearable fitness trackers flooding the market today. The grip has just tightened again with Cue – a device that allows users to run medical diagnostics from the comfort of their own home.  Read More

The True Love Tester bra automatically unhooks itself when it senses the woman feeling tru...

In one of the more absurd examples of wearable technology we've seen lately, a Japanese firm has created a high-tech bra called the True Love Tester that literally snaps open only when it senses that the woman is in love.  Read More

The tenofovir disoproxil fumarate intravaginal ring – or TDF-IVR, for short

According to UNAIDS, a member of the United Nations Development Group, 58 percent of people living with HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa are women. Although preventative drugs and condoms do block the transmission of HIV, neither are always practical, available or affordable in developing nations. Help could be on its way, however, in the form of an anti-HIV intravaginal ring that is worn continuously for up to 30 days.  Read More

An electron microscope image of the fabric, complete with blocked sperm

While condoms are the only things that protect against both unwanted pregnancies and HIV, a lot of people aren’t big fans of stopping to put them on. Additionally, women are sometimes put in an awkward role, needing to pressure the man to use the thing – although female condoms certainly do exist, their bulkiness makes them rather unpopular. Now, however, a team of scientists from the University of Washington are working on a type of dissolvable fabric that could be used by women both for contraception and HIV protection.  Read More

Buttons and the joystick on the Casio EXILIM EX-JE10 can apparently be easily operated eve...

Casio has announced a selection of new cameras which, it's claimed, were designed to appeal to women. How do you make a woman-friendly camera, you ask? Well, Casio seems to be of the opinion that offering a range of colors (obviously including pink), textured finishes and buttons which can be pressed even if you have long nails, will do the job.  Read More

The Intra Uterine Ball, or IUB, is said to offer advantages over traditional intrauterine ...

If a woman wishes to avoid pregnancy for the time being, but thinks she might want to get pregnant at some point in the future, then using an intrauterine device (IUD) is often a good course of action – the simple devices are now the world’s most common form of birth control, as used by women. However, while IUDs are generally fairly safe and reliable, complications can occur. Now, Israel’s OCON Medical has announced the forthcoming availability of something that it claims is considerably safer and more effective – the Intra Uterine Ball, or IUB.  Read More

The HemoGlobe promises to provide an inexpensive way to detect anemia in the developing wo...

A terrible scourge in the developing world, anemia claims hundreds of thousands of lives every year. Medical tests to detect the condition and prevent tragedy are often unavailable, but students at John Hopkins University have invented a sensor that turns a cell phone into an inexpensive blood analysis tool. At an awards ceremony in Seattle on July 14, the bioengineernig undergraduates revealed their device, the HemoGlobe, which will soon be undergoing testing in Africa.  Read More

The new female body armor will be tested next (northern hemisphere) summer

Body armor is a blessing and a curse for soldiers. Modern tactical armor has saved thousands of lives from bullets and bombs, but it can also be a major problem if it doesn’t fit properly. That’s what the women who make up 14 percent of the U.S. Army face on a regular basis. Now, according to the Army News Service, the Army is preparing to test a new armor that is tailored to the female form to replace the standard men's armor that the women now use. Working on data collected in studies overseas and at stateside army bases, the Program Executive Office (PEO) Soldier has identified several problem areas and has developed a new armor that will be tested in 2013.  Read More

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