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Women


— Health & Wellbeing

FDA ticks off on drug to boost female libido

The first ever prescription pill to boost women's libido has won the approval of US regulators. Addyi got the final nod from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Tuesday after three 24-week trials showed it to offer an increase in sexual desire in premenopausal women, though the agency does warn of side effects that include low blood pressure and fainting.

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Leoht Tote has technology in the bag

The Leoht Tote could put an end to rummaging in the depths of your handbag for your phone, only to discover the battery is almost dead. Dubbed "the evolution of the handbag" it comes with in-built lithium ion battery and LED lighting, two USB ports and wireless recharging capabilities – and it looks good, too. Read More
— Wearables

Responsive "Bionic Bra" adjusts to breast movement

According to a recent University of Portsmouth study, almost one in five women avoid exercise because of breast-related problems, such as pain, embarrassment about excessive breast bounce and not being able to find the right sports bra. That’s around 20 percent of women who may be missing out on the health benefits of physical activity. Fortunately, help is on the way in the form of the Bionic Bra, which quickly adjusts to breast movement, providing more – or less – support as required. Read More
— Health & Wellbeing

Cue lets users perform medical diagnostics at home

Not so long ago, self health monitoring was largely limited to weighing ourselves to see how a diet was going and sticking a thermometer under our tongue to see if we were getting sick. For everything else we went to the family doctor. That was in the past. Technology has put health and fitness monitoring firmly in consumers’ hands. Starting with pedometers in the 1980s and progressing to the myriad wearable fitness trackers flooding the market today. The grip has just tightened again with Cue – a device that allows users to run medical diagnostics from the comfort of their own home. Read More
— Health & Wellbeing

Intravaginal ring could block HIV transmission to women

According to UNAIDS, a member of the United Nations Development Group, 58 percent of people living with HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa are women. Although preventative drugs and condoms do block the transmission of HIV, neither are always practical, available or affordable in developing nations. Help could be on its way, however, in the form of an anti-HIV intravaginal ring that is worn continuously for up to 30 days. Read More
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