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Wireless

Buttons are that most basic of user interfaces and are found on just about every machine or electronic device going around. Now, thanks to wireless technology, standalone buttons designed to perform different functions are becoming a thing. One such example is Droplet, a button that can be stuck to just about anything and be pressed to trigger a message of register that an activity has been carried out. Read More
Late last year, Voxoa launched a crowdfunding campaign to bring a cool device called BTunes to market. Rather than buy a new set of Bluetooth-enabled cans to enjoy some wireless freedom, users would just plug the unit into the audio port of favored headphones, power on and pair up. The BTS from Noble allows users to plug in their earphones of choice and put some sweet wireless distance between them and the source player. Read More
Wireless charging is a convenient technology, allowing users to charge their smart devices without worrying about cables. But it's still young, and has some problems – specifically the fact that users need to line up the device with the charger correctly to get it to work. This can sometimes end up not being much easier than plugging in. That's why the team at Rubix is developing its On wireless charger and case, which promises to make wireless charging easier thanks to magnets. Read More
Last year, a team of engineers led by Olle Lindén launched on Kickstarter to bring the world's smallest wireless earphones into production. The Earin campaign raised almost a million bucks from folks wanting to pop them in and strut down the street like Ryan Reynolds in Definitely Maybe. Though the slick ear bullets have yet to be shipped, they've already got some serious competition snapping at their heels. 21 year-old Australian Jonathan Zuvela has developed Nextear, equally teeny wireless in-ear headphones that come with a portable recharging case packing built-in storage and an LED flashlight. Read More
With Google Voice all but dead, it makes sense that the company was busy behind the scenes, cooking up a new angle for taking on the telecom industry. Today we have it, in the form of Project Fi: Google's long-rumored Mobile Virtual Network Operator (MVNO) service. Read More
The vast range of Wi-Fi-enabled devices available today means that anyone could have several personal electronic devices all trying to connect to a network simultaneously. Multiply this by many hundreds of people in a busy public place with Wi-Fi connectivity and this often means that available bandwidth is greatly reduced. To help address this problem, researchers at Oregon State University claim to have invented a new system called WiFO that incorporates infrared LEDs to boost the available Wi-Fi bandwidth by as much as ten times. Read More
Imagine if you had your hands full preparing a meal, but then had to put everything down so you could reach over to turn the recipe page on your laptop or tablet. Well, you wouldn't have to if you were using the NailO. Being developed by a team at the MIT Media Lab, the thumbnail-mounted trackpad is operated by the index finger of the same hand. Read More
Just over a year ago, Livid Instruments ended a successful Kickstarter campaign to bring its Guitar Wing wireless controller to life. The device is attached to the lower horn of an electric guitar or bass to enable wireless control of apps and DAWs running on a computer. After working closely with Apple engineers, the company has now announced support for the new Bluetooth LE MIDI protocol for Yosemite OS X and iOS 8. Read More

Headlights, tail lights and even turn indicators certainly make cycling safer, but reaching around to operate all those devices at once could be a bit awkward. That's why Bontrager has announced its new Transmitr system. It allows multiple lights to be controlled from one handlebar-mounted remote, via the ANT+ wireless protocol. Read More

The Twiddler3 is a combination keyboard and mouse held in just one hand and relying on chorded movements similar to holding and playing a guitar. Receiving one for review, I was initially impressed by its natural feel in my hand and was curious how it would fit into work and play, and as a peripheral for both my laptop and Android phone. Read More
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