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Weather

The Skywatch Windoo measures wind and other weather

The Skywatch Windoo series of anemometers from Swiss company JDC Electronic SA pack wind- and weather-tracking power into your smartphone by way of a sleek, plug-in unit that's small enough to clip on to your keychain.  Read More

A study conducted by Dr Rongjia Tao from Temple University suggests that 1,000 ft (300 m) ...

The Great Wall of China was primarily built to keep out nomadic tribes, but a new study suggests constructing great walls in the American Midwest could keep out a different kind of threat – tornadoes. It might sound far-fetched, but a study conducted by Dr. Rongjia Tao from the Department of Physics at Philadelphia's Temple University suggests there is in fact some scientific merit to it. Strategically placed, 1,000 ft (300 m) high great walls could negate the forming of the destructive wind storms in Tornado Alley, and by extension, the destruction they leave in their wake.  Read More

Denmark's Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has been awarded $335 million to improve lower Manhatt...

The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has announced the six winning proposals of its Rebuild by Design competition. Approximately $920 million is being awarded to the winners, in a bid to improve flood and stormwater protection at six vulnerable areas around New York and New Jersey.  Read More

Artist's impression of the GPM satellite (Image: NASA/Britt Griswold)

Control of NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement Core satellite (GPM) has been handed over to the team of engineers who will maintain operational control of the piece of equipment for the remainder of its life in space. The GPM mission, launched on February 27 atop a Japanese manufactured H-IIA rocket, will work in tandem with a constellation of pre-existing satellites with the objective of creating a unified measurement of rain and snow-fall on a global scale.  Read More

The GPM Core Observatory is launched aboard a Japanese H-IIA rocket from the Tanegashima S...

The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory was launched last Thursday aboard a Japanese H-IIA rocket that blasted off from Tanegashima Space Center on Tanegashima Island in southern Japan. Weighing in at 4-ton, the GPM is the largest spacecraft ever built at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and will help provide a more detailed picture of the Earth's precipitation to assist climate scientists and help improve forecasting of extreme weather events.  Read More

The CRUTEM4 dataset provides Google Earth users with access to one of the most widely used...

Talking about the weather is a pastime as old as language, but climate researchers from the University of East Anglia (UEA) in the UK have just given people a whole lot more to talk about. As part of an ongoing effort to increase the accessibility and transparency of data on past climate and climate change, they've made one of the most widely used records of Earth's climate accessible through Google Earth.  Read More

Artist's impression of the GPM Core Observatory due to launch on February 27th (Image: NAS...

NASA is set to launch a new satellite designed to take detailed, near real-time measurements of rain and snowfall on a global scale whilst mapping the interior of storm systems. The Core Observatory of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) has been in development since 2005 and is a collaboration project between NASA and the Japanese Space Agency (JAXA). The satellite is due to be launched on the Japanese manufactured H-IIA delivery vehicle from the Tanegashima Space Centre, Tanegashima Island, Japan, on February 27.  Read More

Southwest Airlines has installed water vapor sensing systems on many of its aircraft (Phot...

Every 12 hours, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) launches weather balloons from approximately 70 locations across the US. While these do provide valuable data, a lot can change between those intervals and those locations. That's why a new project is taking advantage of something that's already going up in the sky on a much more frequent basis and in a higher number of locations – Southwest Airlines jets.  Read More

The RainCars project's lab setup

Rain gauges are generally pretty accurate at measuring the amount of precipitation that has fallen at their location, but they can't be everywhere. This means that average rainfall figures for a region could be inaccurate, if considerably more or less rain has been falling in unmonitored areas. Cars, however, are just about everywhere that there are roads. With that in mind, researchers from Germany's University of Hanover are looking at using them to tell us how much water is coming from the sky.  Read More

A phone running OpenSignal's WeatherSignal app

Smartphone batteries contain tiny temperature sensors, designed to keep the phone from overheating. While those sensors do measure the heat generated within the phone, their readings are also affected by the temperature of the phone’s external environment. With that in mind, British app developer OpenSignal has created a system that allows multiple users’ phones to provide real-time, location-specific weather reports.  Read More

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