2015 Detroit NAIAS Auto Show

Wearable

Gizmag fires up some of the wackiest, most niche or not-ready-for-primetime wearables we r...

The wearables trend was on full display at CES 2015 in Las Vegas earlier this month, where we spotted lots of new wearables, including many that we'd be shocked to ever see in the wild.  Read More

Apple today announced that it's targeting an April ship date for the long-anticipated Appl...

When Apple announced its Apple Watch last September, all we knew about its release date is that it would be "early 2015." Today CEO Tim Cook snuck a more specific nugget of info into its Q1 earnings call: the company expects Apple Watch shipments to start in April.  Read More

The NHL is promising 'never-before-seen perspectives of the game' in its use of the GoPro ...

As wearable cameras get smaller, lighter and more powerful, so their potential increases, and the new deal that GoPro has inked with the National Hockey League is proof of that. Some of the players in last weekend's 2015 All-Stars Skills Competition and 2015 Honda NHL All-Star Game were kitted out with head-mounted GoPro cameras to capture all the action as it happened and give viewers a unique angle on the play.  Read More

The Gear S still isn't perfect, but it's the only smartwatch that could have fit our purpo...

As Samsung's sixth smartwatch in the span of a year, the Gear S was almost easy to dismiss. But after using one all through the insane week known as CES, we think it might be one of the more underrated tech products you can buy today.  Read More

The RideOn goggles bring augmented reality to the ski slopes.

Wearable technology is popping up in more and more areas of life — and that includes the ski slopes. The RideOn AR snow goggles have just appeared on Indiegogo, offering skiers and snowboarders a view of the mountain augmented with digital overlays. Don one of these headsets and you can get directions, messages, weather reports, virtual gates and more projected right in front of your eyes.  Read More

The next frontier in human-computer interaction will be all about making you feel the virt...

Tactile feedback is nothing new. It's been used in telecommunications and in entertainment for decades, and it became a standard feature in the late 1990s in mobile phones and video games – where vibrations alert you to new messages or help you "feel" the forces exerted on your avatar. Haptic technology has been very much a bit player in the fields that it's infiltrated, though, and only now are we seeing it begin to take its place alongside visual and audio tech as a key element in human-computer interaction.  Read More

The ActiveProtective airbag (pictured undeployed) reportedly reduces impact to the hip bon...

For anyone who uses a car, collisions are an ever-present danger – that's why vehicles are equipped with safety features such as airbags. For senior citizens, however, simply falling down can also result in life-changing injuries. With that in mind, Pennsylvania-based company ActiveProtective is developing a wearable airbag that deploys in the event of a fall, to protect seniors' hip bones.  Read More

Gizmag goes hands-on (for a second time) with the Avegant Glyph, which is like a head-worn...

Though some have described the Avegant Glyph as a virtual reality headset, we think that's way off the mark. And having demoed the Oculus Rift just a few hours before test-driving the Glyph, we can attest that the two are completely different products. Read on, for Gizmag's second pre-release look at Avegant's portable movie theater.  Read More

BlackBox revealed its Linx IAS at CES 2015

Concussions – or at least concussion discussions – are all the rage lately, particularly in relation to professional sports leagues like the NFL. BlackBox Biometrics is adding to the discussion with a small, lightweight sensor designed to track concussive forces. Derived from the company's military blast force sensor, the consumer-grade Linx IAS straps to the head via a beanie or headband and measures impacts, providing an easy-read analysis that can help athletes identify concussions.  Read More

Thync is a product that promises to change your mood – and it actually works (Photo: Will ...

After spending a week walking the showroom floors of CES, a wearable claiming to change your mood is probably going to activate your BS sensors. But today our demo of the Thync wearable was the rare CES meeting that's everything it's pretending to be – possibly more. Your neighborhood drug dealer might want to start looking for a new line of work.  Read More

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