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wearable electronics

— Wearables

ODG's smartglasses are like a high-end Android tablet for your face (hands-on)

For the second straight CES, we spent some time hanging out with Osterhout Design Group (ODG), makers of the most badass smartglasses this side of Hololens. ODG's glasses are still aimed primarily at enterprise customers and developers (and priced accordingly), but if or when they eventually become full-on consumer products, there's a pretty good chance you're going to want a pair.

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— VR

As Oculus announces a second bundled game, some speculation on the Rift's price

A few decades ago, the Nintendos and Segas of the world used to bundle a flagship title with their gaming consoles: be it Super Mario Bros. or Sonic the Hedgehog. That doesn't happen with today's systems, apart from special edition bundles – which often cost around US$50 more than buying the system by itself. With VR, though, Oculus is going one-up on those old-school game consoles, bundling not just one but two highly-anticipated games with the Oculus Rift. When we add this together with some other recent clues, we think this could mean roughly a $500-600 price tag for the Rift.

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— Sports

Multi-sensor wearable is made to give tennis players an edge

Wearable technology for tennis players that goes beyond a single sensing device in the racket or on the wrist is becoming a reality, with the introduction of the Pivot multi-sensor system. Developed by TuringSense, Pivot is designed to replace motion capture technology with a system that incorporates nine different sensors, each about the size and weight of an acorn, to provide instant feedback on a player's biomechanics without wires or cameras.

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— Smartwatches

Fossil Q Founder early impressions: Fossil Group's first smartwatch looks great, is reasonably priced

As smartwatches continue to become more mainstream, traditional watchmakers are going through a transitional period. Instead of seeing smartwatches merely as a threat, though, companies like Tag Heuer and Fossil are embracing the opportunity and trying to make great smartwatches themselves. It's too early to know if "great" is the right word for this Android Wear-running watch (we'll run a full review after spending more time with it), but the Fossil Q Founder is certainly promising.

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— Wearables

PowearIN jacket wires your torso with a kitchen sink of tech

Battling the likes of the Tec Jacket 2.0 for the title of "world's most high-tech jacket," the all-new PowearIN jacket gives you surplus pocket space for gadgetry, integrated gadget charging, a built-in flashlight and a wireless dial to control external devices. It can even transform into a messenger bag and carry your your electronics on your shoulder when it's too hot for a waterproof-breathable coat.

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— Wearables

SignLanguageGlove gives voice to hearing and speech impaired

In an effort to further open the lines of communication for people with hearing and speech disabilities, a university student in London is developing a smart glove that converts sign language into text and spoken dialogue. Dubbed the SignLanguageGlove, the wearable device features a handful of sensors to convert hand and finger movements into words, with its creator now looking to add real-time language translation to the mix.

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— Sports

Moxy Sensor monitors muscle blood oxygen levels while you workout

Dizziness and severe shortage of breath is a pretty sure sign of overexertion, but sometimes you won't know you've pushed yourself too far until you're hunched over the park bench gasping for air. The stick-on Moxy Monitor is designed to give athletes a window into how their body is performing during a workout, by tracking blood oxygen levels in their muscles in real time and displaying this along with other fitness data in third party apps and devices.

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