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wearable electronics

Electronics

Precise embroidered circuits bring next-gen smart clothing closer to reality

From sweat-sensing wristbands to electrode-embedded workout suits, new innovations in smart clothing are coming thick and fast. Now, Ohio State University researchers have made another big breakthrough, managing to create embroidered circuits using metallic thread that's just 0.1 mm thick. By embedding different patterns, the tech could be used to create everything from a t-shirt that boosts your cellphone signal, to a hat that tracks brain activity.Read More

Robotics

Cheaper, transparent smart skin powers itself

Flexible, wearable sensors open the door for everything from more effective health monitoring to robots with a sense of touch that can respond to stimuli like humans. While numerous electronic skin technologies have been developed, getting costs down has remained a problem. A Chinese team of scientists has now developed a new transparent smart skin that they claim is not only cheaper to produce, but is also able to harvest mechanical energy to power itself from movement.Read More

Smartwatches

Victorinox and Acer team up on Swiss Army smartwatch

Smartwatches have already gone Swiss with models like the Breitling B55 Connected and Tag Heuer Connected, and now they're going Swiss Army. Developed by Acer, the new Cybertool brings some smarts to the Victorinox Inox watch, turning it into a Swiss Army smartwatch with classic analog dial. Add a couple other available accessories, and the Inox becomes a veritable Swiss Army knife for the wrist.Read More

Wearables

Skiing wearable tracks your feet, coaches you into better times on the slopes

Wearable technology is taking to the slopes with the introduction of Carv, a two-part monitoring system that provides lessons and real-time feedback for skiers based on motion analysis and pressure data. Skiers place one monitor on the outside of their ski boot and the second on the inside, and the data gathered from the monitors is then analyzed via an iPhone or Android app with feedback available either through earphones or an on-screen display.Read More

VR Feature

State of the Game: Virtual Reality

You've probably heard by now that virtual reality is supposed to be a thing this year. But if you have some catching up to do on the innovations, upcoming headsets and what to look for when making a decision, let Gizmag lend a hand with the latest installment of our State of the Game series: Virtual Reality.Read More

Wearables

ODG's smartglasses are like a high-end Android tablet for your face (hands-on)

For the second straight CES, we spent some time hanging out with Osterhout Design Group (ODG), makers of the most badass smartglasses this side of Hololens. ODG's glasses are still aimed primarily at enterprise customers and developers (and priced accordingly), but if or when they eventually become full-on consumer products, there's a pretty good chance you're going to want a pair.Read More

VR

As Oculus announces a second bundled game, some speculation on the Rift's price

A few decades ago, the Nintendos and Segas of the world used to bundle a flagship title with their gaming consoles: be it Super Mario Bros. or Sonic the Hedgehog. That doesn't happen with today's systems, apart from special edition bundles – which often cost around US$50 more than buying the system by itself. With VR, though, Oculus is going one-up on those old-school game consoles, bundling not just one but two highly-anticipated games with the Oculus Rift. When we add this together with some other recent clues, we think this could mean roughly a $500-600 price tag for the Rift.Read More

Sports

Multi-sensor wearable is made to give tennis players an edge

Wearable technology for tennis players that goes beyond a single sensing device in the racket or on the wrist is becoming a reality, with the introduction of the Pivot multi-sensor system. Developed by TuringSense, Pivot is designed to replace motion capture technology with a system that incorporates nine different sensors, each about the size and weight of an acorn, to provide instant feedback on a player's biomechanics without wires or cameras. Read More

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