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Health & Wellbeing

Tiny exoskeleton has a huge goal

When we think of mobility-enhancing exoskeletons, we tend to picture them being worn by adults. Engineers at the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), however, have developed one that's designed specifically for kids. Not only does it help disabled children to walk, but it may also even save their lives.Read More

Robotics

suitX announces "world's most affordable" powered exoskeleton – the Phoenix

When it comes to the price of most products, US$40,000 is pretty high. In the case of powered exoskeletons, however, it's cheap – at least half the typical price. Nonetheless, that's approximately what suitX's Phoenix modular exoskeleton should sell for, bringing the technology to a whole new income class. And at 27 lb (12.25 kg), it's also one of the lightest models ever made.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Internet-connected brace designed to help seniors avoid falls

Falls can be devastating for the elderly, which is why Orthotic Holdings Inc (OHI) first created the Moore Balance Brace. It's a foot and ankle support, which is designed to improve the balance and stability of its wearers – as long as they use it correctly, that is. With that in mind, OHI has partnered with wearable fitness tech firm Sensoria Fitness to create the internet-connected Smart Moore Balance Brace.Read More

Good Thinking

ReWalk Robotics announces faster, sleeker exoskeleton

There are now a number of powered exoskeletons either on the market or in development, all of which allow people who lack the use of their legs to walk in an upright position. The ReWalk device is without doubt the best-known, having been commercially available since 2012. This week, ReWalk Robotics announced the sixth version of the product, which is reportedly better-fitting, faster and less bulky than its predecessors.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Unpowered ankle exoskeleton takes a load off calf muscles to improve walking efficiency

We might have started off in the water, but humans have evolved to be extremely efficient walkers, with a walk in the park being, well, a walk in the park. Human locomotion is so efficient that many wondered whether it was possible to reduce the energy cost of walking without the use of an external energy source. Now researchers at Carnegie Mellon and North Carolina State have provided an answer in the affirmative with the development of an unpowered ankle exoskeleton.Read More

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