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Smartphones with simple lens attachments might soon be able to analyze fluid samples (Phot...

We've recently seen a number of projects aimed at creating Star Trek-like medical tricorders, that take the form of stand-alone electronic devices built specifically for the purpose. Now, however, scientists at the University of Houston are taking an approach that's currently popular in many other areas of product design – they've asked, "Why build a whole new device, if a smartphone can provide the electronics?". The result is a proposed phone lens attachment, that could be used to diagnose diseases in real time.  Read More

The Wi-Fi virus could reportedly spread as quickly as an airborne biological virus (Image:...

We all know to look out for viruses that can be spread over the internet, or by sharing files between computers. Now, however, scientists at the University of Liverpool have shown for the first time that special viruses could move between wireless access points using existing Wi-Fi networks – as efficiently as the common cold virus spreads between people through the air.  Read More

South Korea is reportedly looking into crippling North Korea's nuclear program, using a St...

According to a report from Yonhap News Agency, South Korea has announced its intention to create a sophisticated cyberwarfare virus designed to undermine North Korea's advancing nuclear program. The Ministry of Defense in putting forward its proposal to the South Korean Parliamentary Defense Committee, stated that it would attempt to design the cyber weapon on the Stuxnet model.  Read More

FixMeStick is a first plug-in device designed to remove hard-to-detect malware from Apple ...

Back in 2012, Montreal-based entrepreneurs Marty Algire and Corey Velan released a product known as the FixMeStick. It's a bootable USB device that detects and eliminates viruses in PCs ... and now a Mac version is in the pipe.  Read More

NTU Prof Peter Preiser and scientist Dr Annie Gao

A new discovery by scientists from Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University (NTU) holds promise for the development of a Malaria vaccine. The result of five years research, the breakthrough is based on the ability to block the invasion of red blood cells by the deadly parasite.  Read More

The genetically modified M13 virus creates maganese oxide nanowires with spikes providing ...

In recent years, lithium-air batteries that promise improved power density per pound over lithium-ion batteries have been the subject of much research in the quest to give electronic vehicles greater range. By enlisting the help of a genetically-modified virus, researchers at MIT have found a way to improve the performance and durability of lithium-air batteries, which offer the potential of two to three times the energy density of current lithium-ion batteries.  Read More

Scientists at the Oregon Health and Science University have announced a positive step towa...

A very promising vaccine candidate for HIV/AIDS has shown the ability to completely clear the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), a very aggressive form of HIV that leads to AIDS in monkeys. Developed at the Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute at the Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU), the vaccine proved successful in about fifty percent of the subjects tested and could lead to a human vaccine preventing the onset of HIV/AIDS and even cure patients currently on anti-retroviral drugs.  Read More

An optofluidic chip uses fluorescence to detect virus particles

To monitor their infection levels, people carrying chronic viral infections such as hepatitis and HIV need to get their viral load regularly checked. This measures how many viruses are present in a certain volume of blood or bodily fluid with current tests being expensive and needing to be done through laboratories. However, newly developed optical techniques being developed by two independent teams at the University of California could deliver cheaper and faster viral load tests that could be carried out in a medical office, hospital or even in the field.  Read More

Bacteriophage attacking an infectious bacterium

Though not something people like to ponder, the purpose of mucus as a protective barrier that keeps underlying tissues moist and traps bacteria and other foreign organisms is well known. However, researchers at San Diego State University (SDSU) have now discovered that the surface of mucus is also the site of an independent human immune system that actively protects us from infectious agents in the environment.  Read More

New research has found that tobacco plants can be genetically modified to produce antibodi...

We are familiar with the tobacco plant being harvested to create products that damage our health, but a new study from the Hotung Molecular Immunology Unit at St George’s University in London has shown that tobacco plants can be genetically modified to produce rabies antibodies. It's hoped that the research will deliver a safe, inexpensive way of treating rabies in developing countries.  Read More

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