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Vaccines

Researchers have developed a drug that is able to prevent multiple strains of HIV from inf...

A novel vaccine for the AIDS virus may become possible through a new compound proving highly effective in preventing HIV infection. While testing has only been carried out on monkeys so far, the scientists behind the development say that with its ability to block multiple strains of infection at once, the technique has huge potential to one day provide long-lasting protection against the deadly virus.  Read More

The customized bubbles are made using a combination of soap-like components that transform...

As if soap bubbles don't spread enough happiness on their own, scientists have discovered a way of coating them in biomolecules with a view to treating viruses, cancer and other diseases. The technology has been developed at the University of Maryland, where researchers devised a method of tricking the body into mistaking the bubbles for harmful cells, triggering an immune response and opening up new possibilities in the delivery of drugs and vaccines.  Read More

A vaccine currently in development may be more effective at keeping nicotine molecules fro...

If you're a smoker who's trying to quit, you may recall hearing about vaccines designed to cause the body's immune system to treat nicotine like a foreign invader, producing antibodies that trap and remove it before it's able to reach receptors in the brain. It's a fascinating idea, but according to scientists at California's Scripps Research Institute, a recent high-profile attempt had a major flaw. They claim to have overcome that problem, and are now developing a vaccine of their own that they believe should be more effective.  Read More

An Ebola vaccine delivered through the nose and into the airways could help reduce the spr...

Scientists have produced a single dose Ebola vaccine shown to provide primates with long-term protection from the deadly disease. What is most promising about the development is the delivery method, with the vaccine administered through the nose and lungs, mitigating the associated risk of spreading the disease through infected needles.  Read More

The new vaccine’s active ingredient comes from hookworms themselves, a protein from a comm...

A clinical trial of a permanent vaccine for hookworm has been completed in Brazil, giving hope for a permanent end to a problem that affects 600 million people worldwide. US-based Sabin Vaccine Institute, which has developed the vaccine has called hookworm "one of the most pervasive neglected tropical diseases (NTD) affecting the world’s poor."  Read More

Dr. Anne Moore displays the microneedle patch

Scientists at University College Cork in Ireland have successfully finished pre-clinical testing of an experimental vaccine against malaria delivered through the skin. The method is an improvement on this type of vaccine delivery, whose use is being researched in relation to other infections as well, including Ebola and HIV.  Read More

Newly-developed nasal spray vaccines offer some key advantages over injections  (Photo: Sh...

Vaccines save lives, but sometimes they fail to reach the people who need them most, in parts of the developing world. A research team from Iowa State University is currently developing a new generation of vaccines that uses nanotechnology, and is delivered in spray form. One of the advantages of this new type of vaccine is that is can increase access to people living in remote areas because it requires no refrigeration and is simpler to administer.  Read More

New technology could allow vaccines to be produced when and where they're needed (Photo: S...

Researchers from the University of Washington have created a vaccine with the potential to make on-demand vaccination cheaper and quicker, using engineered nanoparticles. Tests with mice show definite promise for the technology's use on humans.  Read More

Scientists at the Oregon Health and Science University have announced a positive step towa...

A very promising vaccine candidate for HIV/AIDS has shown the ability to completely clear the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), a very aggressive form of HIV that leads to AIDS in monkeys. Developed at the Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute at the Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU), the vaccine proved successful in about fifty percent of the subjects tested and could lead to a human vaccine preventing the onset of HIV/AIDS and even cure patients currently on anti-retroviral drugs.  Read More

Scientists have used microneedle arrays to store a live vaccine at room temperature, and a...

While it’s vitally important to bring vaccines for diseases such as tuberculosis to developing nations, getting them there is only part of the challenge. Because these countries often have unreliable infrastructures, it’s entirely possible that the vaccines can’t consistently be kept as cold as is required. As a result, they could be rendered ineffective. Now, however, scientists from King’s College London have succeeded in containing a dried live vaccine in a microneedle array, that doesn’t need to be refrigerated.  Read More

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