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US Army


— Military

Unmanned helicopter and ground vehicle team up to explore dangerous terrain

Autonomous aircraft and autonomous ground vehicles can eliminate much of the danger for military personnel working in hazardous areas. But what if they could combine their capabilities to even further remove soldiers from harm's way? Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) together with Sikorsky Aircraft have deployed an autonomous helicopter and all-terrain robot to demonstrate what might be possible when advanced, unmanned vehicles join forces.

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GM, US Army extreme testing hydrogen fuel cell Colorado

General Motors and the US Army are joining forces to put hydrogen fuel cell technology to the test in extreme military environments. The project will see the Army's Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) run a 12 month test on a Chevrolet Colorado pickup truck modified to run on a commercial hydrogen fuel cell and electric powertrain.

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— Military

US Army reads soldier's brain waves to speed up image analysis

Technology, from satellites to drones, has dramatically increased the amount of imagery being gathered by military intelligence, posing a daunting task for the analysts that must look at and and evaluate it. Researchers at the US Army's Mission Impact through Neurotechnology Design (MIND) Lab at the Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland are looking to speed things up by leveraging the power of the human brain.

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— Drones

US Army tests drone-killing 50 mm cannon

While civilian countermeasures to combat malicious drones is moving toward UAV-freezing radio beams, the US Army is taking a more permanent approach. Under development by the U.S. Army Research, Development, and Engineering Center (ARDEC) at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, the Enhanced Area Protection and Survivability (EAPS) system used steerable 50 mm smart rounds to shoot down two drones in recent tests.

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— Military

US Army tests remote controlled weapon towers

One of the more unpleasant aspects of army life has always been guard duty. It's also very labor intensive. In the US Army, it takes four to six soldiers standing for up to 12 hours to man a single perimeter weapons system. To free up personnel for more important duties, the Army is testing the Tower Hawk System, which uses tower-mounted, remote-controlled weapons for base perimeter security.

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— Military

MAXFAS exoskeleton improves soldiers' aim

Mention military exoskeletons and it will likely conjure up visions of something like Iron Man, that gives a soldier super strength or the ability to march all day with a pack the size of a piano. However, exoskeletons can provide more than brute strength. Taking a page from therapy exoskeletons, Dan Baechle, a mechanical engineer at the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL), is developing the MAXFAS exoskeleton that doesn't make soldiers stronger, but better shots instead.

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— Military

World's first military blast test dummy to join the US Army

For something commonly called a "dummy," the mannequins used in crash tests are surprisingly sophisticated and so specialized that they're not much use out of automotive safety labs. When the US Army went looking for a dummy of its own, it had to go back to square one by awarding a contract to California-based Diversified Technical Systems (DTS) to help develop the first instrumented dummy designed for military vehicle blast testing. Read More
— Military

Video game gives soldiers better skills to handle bomb-sniffing dogs

For centuries, dogs have served in a variety of roles alongside humans, including faithful companion and guardian. The latter function is one that’s seen more focus in recent times as canines have been trained to sniff out buried improvised explosive devices (IEDs) before they are detonated. The dog’s handler also needs to be trained to detect subtle cues from the animal, which is where a video game developed by the US military comes into play. Read More
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