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University of Tokyo

— Wearable Electronics

New conductive ink makes your clothing smarter

By - June 29, 2015 2 Pictures

A new single-step printing process uses an elastic conducting ink to turn clothing and other textiles into flexible, wearable electronic devices or sensors. Researchers at the University of Tokyo developed the ink, which remains highly conductive even when stretched to more than three times its original length. They believe it has applications in sensors built into sportswear and underwear and that it could be part of a shift toward more comfortable wearable electronics.

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— Electronics

New e-paper can be written on like a whiteboard

By - April 23, 2015 2 Pictures
By repurposing and updating an e-paper technology from the 1970s, researchers from the University of Tokyo have created a cheap but tough new electronic display that can be written on with a magnet. This new e-paper could be used in low-cost, lightweight electronic whiteboards as well as traditional classroom blackboards, and its creators hope that it will eventually reduce our dependence on real paper. Read More
— Electronics

HaptoMime lets users "touch" a mid-air display

By - October 29, 2014 2 Pictures
Touchscreen interfaces may make our lives easier, but the things do tend to get smeared with finger oil and whatnot, plus they're notorious for spreading germs. That's why a team of researchers at the University of Tokyo, led by assistant professor Yasuaki Monnai, have developed the HaptoMime. It's an ATM-like interface that lets the user feel like they're touching a glass screen, when in fact they're touching nothing at all. Read More
— Digital Cameras

World's fastest camera captures 4.4 trillion frames per second

By - August 20, 2014 1 Picture
At a mind-boggling 4.4 trillion frames per second (FPS), the new STAMP (Sequentially Timed All-optical Mapping Photography) system developed by two Japanese universities is claimed to be the world’s fastest camera. Taking pictures at a resolution of 450 x 450 pixels, the new image-capturing device is purported to be so fast that it can be used to photograph the conduction of heat, which travels at a speed equivalent to one-sixth the velocity of light. Read More
— Robotics

One oven-baked robot to go, please

By - June 1, 2014 1 Picture
Lots of people make their own robots, and in all sorts of ways, but have you ever heard of anyone baking one in an oven? Researchers at MIT have demonstrated how to create self-assembling bodies that fold together when baked, as well as showing how a similar technique can be used to generate electronic components to control them. Read More
— Science

Sharks help scientists and themselves, by wearing cameras and swallowing sensors

By - February 28, 2014 2 Pictures
Perhaps you've seen footage from National Geographic's "Crittercam," an underwater video camera that has been attached to animals such as sharks and whales. Well, scientists from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa and the University of Tokyo have gone one better. Not only have they been putting cameras on sharks to see what they get up to, but they've also been slipping them ingestible sensors, to monitor their dietary habits. The data that they've gathered could help protect shark populations, and the overall health of the ocean. Read More
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