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University of Southern California

Health & Wellbeing

Reversible glue could save soldiers' sight

When soldiers or other people sustain eye injuries, retinal detachment and vision loss can result if the eye's vitreous gel isn't kept from leaking out. Given that Band-Aids can't be placed directly on the eyeball, however, a team of scientists from the University of Southern California has created an alternative – reversible eye glue. Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Soft pneumatic exoskeleton could be perfect for use in rehab

We've recently been hearing a lot about how exoskeletons can be used in rehabilitation, guiding patients' disabled limbs through a normal range of motion in order to develop muscle memory. The problem is, most exoskeletons are rigid, limiting their degrees of freedom to less than those of the body part they're moving. A team of scientists are looking at changing that, with a partial "soft exoskeleton" that replicates the body's own muscles, tendons and ligaments. Read More

Games

Biofeedback-based horror game challenges players to deal with fear

While traditional horror video games seek to provide an exciting thrill, Nevermind is a biofeedback-enhanced horror game that has greater ambitions. It requires you to manage your anxiety in alarming scenarios – the more stressed you feel, the harder the game becomes. The aim, says Erin Reynolds, its creator, is for players to learn how to not let their fears get the best of them in nerve-wracking situations and hopefully carry over their gameplay-acquired skills into the real world.Read More

Electronics

AIO Robotics teases Zeus all-in-one 3D scanner and printer

A new Kickstarter project is set to launch the world's first all-in-one 3D copy machine that can scan, copy, print and even fax 3D objects. Sporting a 7-inch touchscreen and four easy to operate buttons, the Zeus is a stand alone machine that can work independent of both an internet connection and a desktop computer. So instead of running out to buy a hammer the next time you need one, you could simply scan your neighbors or have a friend fax across their hammer scan and print it out on your end. Read More

Health & Wellbeing

The doctor is in: Virtual therapist to help treat stress disorders

Researchers at the University of Southern California’s Institute for Creative Sciences (ICT) are developing a virtual therapist that can identify signs of depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Bringing together machine learning, natural language processing and computer vision technologies, the SimSensei project is aimed at helping military personnel and their families, while reducing the stigma that is often associated with seeking help. Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Drugs shown to stop and even reverse Alzheimer's in mice

Although no one is announcing a cure for Alzheimer’s disease just yet, research recently conducted at the University of Southern California does at least offer a glimmer of hope. Using drugs known as TSPO (translocator protein) ligands, scientists there have successfully halted and even reversed the effects of Alzheimer’s in mice. Read More

Science

Scientists selectively shut off mice’s ability to sense cold

How many times have you been shivering on a winter day, and wished that you were capable of simply not feeling the cold? Well, that’s just what scientists at the University of Southern California have done to a group of lab mice – they disabled the animals’ ability to sense cold, while leaving their ability to sense heat and touch intact. It is hoped that the research could lead to more effective pain medications for humans. Read More

Science

Silicon nanoparticles used to create a super-performing battery

In some peoples’ opinion, electric cars won’t become truly viable until their batteries offer a lot more driving range, and can be recharged much more quickly than is currently possible. Well, those people may soon be getting their wish. Scientists at the University of Southern California have developed a new type of lithium-ion battery, that they claim holds three times as much energy as a conventional li-ion, and can be recharged in just ten minutes.Read More

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