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University of Glasgow

Electronics

Gravity-measuring smartphone tech might save you from a volcano

Although you may not use a gravimeter to detect tiny changes in gravity (or for anything else), they are commonly used in fields such as oil exploration and environmental surveying. They could have more applications, were it not for the fact that they tend to be relatively large and expensive. Scientists at the University of Glasgow have set about addressing that limitation, by creating a compact gravimeter that incorporates smartphone technology.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Existing drugs used to tackle dangerous new viruses

Scientists are constantly searching for new methods of combating harmful viruses, but it's not always necessary to create fresh drugs to deal with new threats. A team of researchers from the Universities of Leeds, Glasgow and Nottingham in the UK has found that a group of drugs currently used to treat conditions such as depression might also prove an effective means of combating emerging viruses.Read More

Materials

Scientists produce graphene 100 times cheaper than ever before

Since first being synthesized by Andre Geim and Kostya Novoselov at the University of Manchester in 2004, there has been an extensive effort to exploit the extraordinary properties of graphene. However the cost of graphene in comparison to more traditional electronic materials has meant that its uptake in electronic manufacturing has been slow. Now researchers at the University of Glasgow have discovered a way to create large sheets of graphene at a fraction of the cost of current methods.Read More

Science

Glasgow scientists create chemical evolution

Scientists haven't created life in the laboratory yet, but when they do, they'll be off and running. Case in point is a University of Glasgow team led by Professor Lee Cronin, the Regius Chair of Chemistry, which has developed the world's first chemical system capable of evolving as part of a project that aims at creating synthetic "life" without DNA.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Experimental food additive makes people feel full sooner

When we get the feeling of "being full," it's because our gut has released hormones that tell our brain to stop being hungry. It would seem to follow, therefore, that people who overeat might benefit from producing greater amounts of those hormones. Well, that's just what an experimental new food additive is claimed to cause the body to do. Read More

Science

Levitated lab-grown cartilage could result in more effective implants

Although it's now possible to create lab-grown cartilage, there's still at least one big challenge in doing so – cartilage grown in a flat Petri dish may not be optimally-shaped for replacing the body's own natural cartilage parts. Scientists from a consortium of UK universities, however, are developing a possible solution. They're using "ultrasonic tweezers" to grow cartilage in mid-air. Read More

Medical

First transfusions of "manufactured" blood planned for 2016

According to the World Health Organization, approximately 107 million blood donations are collected globally every year. Nonetheless, blood is often in short supply – particularly in developing nations. Despite new safeguards, there's also still the risk of incompatibility, or of infections being transmitted from donors to recipients. Charitable organization the Wellcome Trust hopes to address these problems, by developing the ability to manufacture blood outside of the body. Last week, it announced that test subjects should begin receiving transfusions of blood made with lab-grown red blood cells by late 2016. Read More

Good Thinking

A tasty, healthy frozen pizza from Glasgow?

Pizza. An oven-baked flat, round bread covered by a combination of tomato sauce, cheese, and other toppings. Despite this rather clinical description, pizza is arguably the most scrumptious item in the ever-widening field of junk foods ... but must pizza be a junk food? Two people, appropriately named Maclean and Lean of Glasgow, Scotland had an idea for making it healthier.Read More

Science

Scientists make first step towards bringing life to inorganic matter

All life on Earth is carbon-based, which has led to the widespread assumption that any other life that may exist in the universe would also be carbon-based. Excluding the possibility of elements other than carbon forming the basis of life is often referred to as carbon chauvinism and researchers at the University of Glasgow are looking to overcome this bias and provide new insights into evolution by attempting to create “life” from carbon-free, inorganic chemicals. They’ve now taken the first tentative steps towards this goal with the creation of inorganic-chemical-cells, or iCHELLS.Read More

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