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University of Georgia

Electronics

World's smallest diode made from a single DNA molecule

As electronic devices become ever more complex, and the densities of components in those devices increases exponentially, we are rapidly approaching the day when the limitations of Moore's Law will be realized. In an effort to avert this eventuality, research has concentrated on moving away from traditional silicon technologies and into the realms of molecule-sized components and alternative materials. In this vein, researchers at the University of Georgia (UGA) and Ben-Gurion University in Israel have, for the first time, created a nanoscale electronic diode from a single DNA molecule.
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Medical

Protective bubble ferries prostate cancer drugs to their target

Research has uncovered a number of promising drug targets to halt the progression of prostate cancer, including proteins that inhibit the immune response to molecules that drive growth of a tumor's blood vessels. By taking aim at one protein in particular, scientists have been able slow the growth of prostate cancer in mice and also activate a kill switch in the tumor's cells.Read More

Environment

Plug into a plant: A new approach to clean energy harvesting

Millions of years of evolution has resulted in plants being the most efficient harvesters of solar energy on the planet. Much research is underway into ways to artificially mimic photosynthesis in devices like artificial leaves, but researchers at the University of Georgia (UGA) are working on a different approach that gives new meaning to the term “power plant.” Their technology harvests energy generated through photosynthesis before the plants can make use of it, allowing the energy to instead be used to run low-powered electrical devices.Read More

Environment

Genetically modified microorganism could convert atmospheric CO2 into fuel

While much research is being done on capturing carbon dioxide emissions at their source to reduce the amount expelled into the atmosphere, researchers at the University of Georgia’s Bioenergy Systems Research Institute have taken a different approach to tackle the problem. Taking a leaf out of the process used by plants to convert CO2 into something useful, they have uncovered a way to take CO2 from the atmosphere and transform it into useful industrial products, including, potentially, fuel.Read More

Science

Poultry scientists working on "chicken translator"

Any experienced chicken farmer will tell you, the relative contentment of the birds can be gauged by the sounds they’re making. While this has generally been accepted as anecdotal folk wisdom, a team of scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology and the University of Georgia are now trying to scientifically verify it. They’re hoping that their research could lead to better living conditions for the animals, lower costs to farmers, and higher productivity.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

"Fracture putty" could speed healing of broken bones

Anyone who has ever broken a bone knows that while receiving the injury itself is quite unpleasant, being laid up for several weeks to even a few months afterwards is also no picnic. Help may be on the way, however. The U.S. Department of Defense is funding a study, to develop fast bone-healing treatments that could be used on soldiers, along with civilians and even animals. Already, scientists have gotten promising results in laboratory tests, using something they call “fracture putty.”Read More

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