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Training

— Home Entertainment

Start your virtual engines in US$116,650 F1 racing simulator

Players of the Forza and Gran Turismo race series understand that every little advantage counts when working to trim lap times. In game, details like tires, camber angles, damper settings, plus engine mods are just a few of the tuning tricks to enhance a racer's performance. But deep down, budding racers know that such sops to realism are nothing compared to a full-scale F1 simulator. Luckily for them Costco UK and FMCG International have a solution – a US$116,650 full-scale F1 simulator. Read More
— Outdoors

Suunto's second generation of Ambit GPS watches hit the training track

Launched last year, the Suunto Ambit brought a new level of functionality to the GPS watch market. Not only could its GPS keep tabs on your speed, distance and vertical, but it allowed for full navigation functions, routing you in and out of the great outdoors. Suunto has now revealed the second generation of Ambit watches with something for both explorers and athletes. Read More
— Sports

Zero G Soccer teaches players to use their heads ... and feet

To be truly world class in any sport requires an innate ability coupled with years of training, usually starting at a very young age. While it's still impossible to engineer what you're born with, it is possible to train until you improve your skill level to a reasonable level. Training aids can be a useful tool, both for building fitness levels and increasing confidence. The people behind the Zero G Soccer Trainer claim their system does just this for aspiring soccer stars. Read More
— Robotics

Cross training helps humans and robots work better together

Like many people, I spend most of my time worrying about the inevitable robot uprising. MIT is doing its bit to put off that day with its experiments in teaching robots and humans to work together peacefully. Using cross-training techniques, the researchers got robots and humans to swap jobs so they could see things from the others' point of view and carry out tasks more efficiently when working together. Read More
— Sports

Snowboard with built-in brake gives novice riders Kontrol

For years, snowboarding novices have been forced to meet the sport with a combination of terror and pain. Even the smallest bunny hill is horrifying to look at when your legs are locked into a device that you have no idea how to use. One wrong move and you're eating an unpleasant mix of snow, ice and pride. The new Streetboardz Boarder Kontrol takes some of the intimidation out of learning by giving beginners something they've always wanted: instant braking. Read More
— Sports

Ten Count punching bag combines brawn with a brain

Over the years, we’ve seen all sorts of performance-monitoring devices designed for the likes of runners, cyclists and even swimmers. According to Canadian boxer, electrician and boxing coach Michael Williamson, however, the only tech innovation to hit the world of boxing has been the introduction of Velcro closures on the gloves. He decided to address that situation, and invented the Ten Count smart punching bag. Read More
— Marine

Royal Navy installs photo-realistic bridge simulator

On-the-job training is not something you want to do with the bridge team of a frigate costing over a billion pounds, so the Royal Navy uses simulators to bring officers up to speed. The latest is a Photo-realistic warship bridge simulator installed at the Britannia Royal Naval College (BRNC), Dartmouth, England. This simulator uses computers to generate images so realistic that students often sway as the “ship” rolls, even though it’s sitting still. Read More
— Sports

Climblock Rotor wall offers perpetual rock climbing

Indoor climbing gyms have brought the sport of rock climbing into the indoor spaces of dense, boulder-less cities, where traditional rock climbing would be impossible. The next generation of indoor climbing seems to be focused on cramming climbing equipment into even smaller spaces. The case in point is the Rotor dynamic wall from Climblock, which replaces the vertical wall with a rotating drum. Read More
— Sports

Bia sports watch made specifically for women adds à la carte GPS

GPS watches already come in all shapes and sizes (at least if you consider "heavy, square brick" and "massive discus" all shapes and sizes). Now they have a gender. The new Bia sports watch claims to be the first GPS sports watch designed for women, by women. In addition to bringing a little estrogen to a testosterone-dominated market, the watch adds a slim form factor, a separate GPS-GSM unit and a smart set of features. Read More
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