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Training


— Smartwatches

What if a smartwatch could help you shoot (a little more) like Stephen Curry?

By - July 8, 2015 7 Pictures

Few of us have access to a professional coach to help hone our basketball technique, but now sports technology company Onyx Motion hopes you can at least get a decent proxy. Their upcoming smartwatch app, Swish, will analyze your shots and provide tips to improve them, along with a few words of wisdom here and there from veteran NBA shooting guard Ben Gordon as well as other pro players.

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— Bicycles

ebove interactive mountain bike trainer aims to bring the trails indoors

By - January 19, 2015 3 Pictures
Now that much of the Northern Hemisphere is well within the icy clutches of winter, many mountain bikers have turned to riding indoors on rollers or trainers. While that may help them to keep fit, it's still far less fun or interesting than riding outdoors on actual trails. Norwegian startup Activetainment hopes to close that gap a little, however, with its interactive ebove B/01 bike. The trainer moves beneath the rider and becomes easier or more difficult to pedal, in response to the terrain of animated trails on an accompanying tablet. Read More
— Sports

BSXinsight lactate threshold sensor lets athletes know how far to push themselves

By - November 15, 2014 3 Pictures
Whether they're training or taking part in actual competitions, athletes have to maintain a delicate balance – they want to make sure that they're "giving it everything they've got," yet they don't want to push themselves to the point that they cramp up or drop from exhaustion. That's why the BSXinsight was created. Billed as being the world's first wearable lactate threshold sensor, it's made to let athletes know how close they're getting to the edge, so they can approach it but not go over. Read More
— Automotive

The ultimate test drive: BMW Korea opens Driving Center in Incheon

By - July 14, 2014 15 Pictures
BMW has invested some US$75.5 million building the ultimate test drive center in Incheon, near Seoul, South Korea. Customers can stretch the legs of BMW's range of performance cars and motorcycles on a 2.6-kilometer (1.6-mile) closed circuit racetrack, or put an SUV through its paces on an off road area. The 240,000-square meter (almost 60 acre) site will also house a service center, bars and restaurants, training academy, historical exhibits, kids' area – and of course, a giant BMW and MINI showroom. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Cardio First Angel teaches CPR on the job

By - May 25, 2014 5 Pictures
Performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the first 15 minutes following a heart attack can be a literal lifesaver, greatly increasing the victim's chances of survival. However, many people aren't trained in CPR and even those who are can be hesitant to step up in the vital first minutes that can mean the difference between life and death. The Cardio First Angel CPR coach is a simple mechanical device that guides even an untrained person in properly administering CPR. Read More
— Sports

Wilson's sensor-packing Smart Basketball tracks shooting performance

By - April 9, 2014 6 Pictures
Tracking shooting success from different areas on the basketball court can provide valuable insights into the strengths and weaknesses of a player, though it usually involves dedicated statisticians to collect and monitor the data. Looking to extend the benefits of these analytics beyond the professional arena is sporting goods manufacturer Wilson, who has announced its Smart Basketball designed to offer detailed feedback on training performance. Read More
— Computers

Who needs humans? Computers used to teach other computers

By - April 2, 2014 1 Picture
While it may be getting easier for humans to teach robots how to perform new tasks, there's still one potential problem – when a new robot is introduced to a work environment, its user may have to teach it the task over again, from scratch. That might soon no longer be the case, however. Researchers at Washington State University have devised a method by which computers can teach each other, freeing humans from having to do so. Read More
— Military

US Army examining next-gen augmented reality "live synthetic" simulations

By - April 1, 2014 1 Picture
Modern warfare is sometimes compared to a video game, but within ten years combat training may become the most realistic video game imaginable. The US Army’s Future Holistic Training Environment Live Synthetic program is a new approach to combat training that integrates various simulations into a single, remotely accessible system. Used on bases across the country, its goal is to provide the Pentagon with a cheaper, more effective way of training soldiers for future military operations. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Moticon sensor insoles track your feet for injury and performance

By - February 24, 2014 5 Pictures
Athletic and medical tracking is slowly sliding off our wrists and chests and into our clothing. This year's Wearable Technologies Conference Europe showed a strong shift toward clothing items powered by textile sensors, including Mbody smart shorts. Feet are getting in on the act too, with the "world's first fully integrated sensor insole" from Moticon, which turns your shoes into a wireless performance-tracking system. Read More
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