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Training

Sports

Feature-packed Garmin Forerunner 735 XT drops heart rate strap

Garmin's Forerunner range has been at the, erm, forefront of the multi-sport watch world since 2003, but with more choice than ever in the world of fitness and health tracking, competition is intense. The new Forerunner 735 XT wades into battle loaded to the gills with enough tech to satisfy even the most discerning multi-sport users, who no longer need to wear a chest strap to track their heart rate. Read More

Sports

Puma's BeatBot races runners

If you're a serious competitive runner, then training on your own isn't always enough – you need someone else to race against. That said, a fast enough runner might not always be available. What do you do then? Well, if you're one of a lucky few, you may soon be able to use your Puma BeatBot robot.Read More

Computers

Training dogs by computer and "smart harness"

While it's important that dogs know some basic obedience commands at the very least, training them can be a monotonous and frustrating experience. Well, perhaps before too long, we could have computers doing the job for us. They're already being used to teach dogs to sit, at North Carolina State University.Read More

Smartwatches

This strap Shifts your smartwatch's viewing angle for workouts

One of the key reasons to own a smartwatch is its use as a fitness tracker. From the Apple Watch to the Moto 360 (and everything in-between), smartwatches come with a range of neat tricks designed to help you train and track your fitness levels. There's just one problem: your wrist isn't necessarily the best place to wear a smartwatch when you're training. Shift is a (currently crowdfunding) attempt to fix that.Read More

Space

NASA trains pilots with Fused Reality

To gain proficiency, pilots need realistic training, but they also need to avoid needless cost and risk. Real aircraft provide the most obviously realistic training, but they're dangerous in inexperienced hands. Meanwhile, simulators can reproduce much of the look and feel of actual flying without the danger of losing an aircraft or pilot, but they aren't as successful when it comes to complex maneuvers like aerial-refueling. To square the circle, NASA is developing a technology called Fused Reality, which uses a special headset that combines real flying in a real aircraft with an overlaid simulation.Read More

Smartwatches

What if a smartwatch could help you shoot (a little more) like Stephen Curry?

Few of us have access to a professional coach to help hone our basketball technique, but now sports technology company Onyx Motion hopes you can at least get a decent proxy. Their upcoming smartwatch app, Swish, will analyze your shots and provide tips to improve them, along with a few words of wisdom here and there from veteran NBA shooting guard Ben Gordon as well as other pro players.Read More

Bicycles

ebove interactive mountain bike trainer aims to bring the trails indoors

Now that much of the Northern Hemisphere is well within the icy clutches of winter, many mountain bikers have turned to riding indoors on rollers or trainers. While that may help them to keep fit, it's still far less fun or interesting than riding outdoors on actual trails. Norwegian startup Activetainment hopes to close that gap a little, however, with its interactive ebove B/01 bike. The trainer moves beneath the rider and becomes easier or more difficult to pedal, in response to the terrain of animated trails on an accompanying tablet. Read More

Sports

BSXinsight lactate threshold sensor lets athletes know how far to push themselves

Whether they're training or taking part in actual competitions, athletes have to maintain a delicate balance – they want to make sure that they're "giving it everything they've got," yet they don't want to push themselves to the point that they cramp up or drop from exhaustion. That's why the BSXinsight was created. Billed as being the world's first wearable lactate threshold sensor, it's made to let athletes know how close they're getting to the edge, so they can approach it but not go over. Read More

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