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Health & Wellbeing

Neopenda tackles infant mortality in developing countries

Wearables are a dime a dozen in the developed world, but a New York City-based global health startup called Neopenda is looking to use the technology for more than just email notifications and step tracking. The company's namesake device is a baby hat aimed at helping newborns in developing countries survive their first month by tracking vital signs, and sending key information back to a tablet.Read More

Mobile Technology

Mobile sonar tech moves fingers off the screen

Using your big ol' fingers to perform tasks on a smartphone's touchscreen can be difficult enough, with the smaller screen of a smartwatch presenting even more of a challenge. It was with this in mind that scientists at the University of Washington created FingerIO. The technology turns mobile devices into sonar systems that are capable of tracking the user's finger movements on nearby surfaces such as desk tops, or even in mid-air.Read More

Wearables

Garmin's vivoactive HR gets heart rate monitoring and a makeover

When we reviewed the Garmin vivoactive last year, our biggest complaints were the lack of heart rate monitoring and dubious styling. It looks like Garmin was listening, as the firm has now announced the vivoactive HR, an updated model which adds heart rate monitoring, and gives the device a much-needed makeover. Garmin also announced the vivofit 3 tracker which pairs year-long battery life and a backlit display.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Smarter activity tracker knows when you're just pretending to work out

Tricking your fitness tracker into logging a workout when you are in fact just laying on the couch seems like a fairly futile exercise, but there's more to the equation than just fooling yourself. Insurers and health care providers are increasingly relying on tracking data to offer incentives, reduced premiums and keep tabs on clients behavior. This is cause for concern for one team of US researchers, which has developed an activity tracking smartphone app that can better distinguish between real and imitated physical movement. Read More

Wearables

Mio’s Slice activity tracker takes the focus away from counting steps

Many activity trackers give you a step target to walk towards, or an active minute target to count down each day, but while these metrics are easy to understand, they're often not the best measure of fitness or exercise. Along with its new Slice activity tracker, Mio is launching a new Personal Activity Intelligence (PAI) system. This new metric gives you a score to reflect your body's response to exercise based on your heart rate.Read More

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