Computational creativity and the future of AI

Tracking

A 'coach mode' gives workout feedback (Photo: Atlas Wearables)

The Atlas wristband, a wearable that recognizes what activity you're doing to provide more useful fitness tracking data, has made the leap from crowdfunding success to the real world after raising over half a million dollars on Indiegogo last year. Gizmag spotted the Atlas at the Wearable Technology show in London this week.  Read More

The HTC Grip tracker is powered by Under Armour Record, the clothing label's recently laun...

Further to the announcement of its first virtual reality headset, HTC has flagged intentions to get in on another burgeoning wearable gadget trend. The Taiwanese electronics maker has teamed up with Under Armour to produce a wrist-worn fitness tracker that offers yet another solution to keeping tabs on your well being.  Read More

Shift automatically pans and tilts a quadcopter's camera, to keep the subject centered

Although camera-equipped drones have opened up all sorts of film-making possibilities, trying to simultaneously control the aircraft and the camera movements can definitely be challenging. That's why Perceptiv Labs developed Shift. It's a system that allows a DJI or 3D Robotics quadcopter's motorized camera to automatically keep a tagged subject centered in the frame, letting the user concentrate on flying.  Read More

Pixie Points attach to everyday objects allowing them to be located using an augmented rea...

Pixie Points are new location trackers that use your smartphone's camera to locate tagged objects in an actual picture of your surroundings. The system is claimed capable of tracking down "pixified" objects, which are marked with a bold X, to within a few inches of their location.  Read More

New algorithms compare a video's background imagery and audio to that of thousands of othe...

Sometimes, a posted video is the only clue to the whereabouts of a missing person, or a terrorist group. Unfortunately, unless that video has already been geo-tagged, it can often be very difficult to tell where it was shot. Now, however, scientists have created algorithms that can determine a video's location by comparing its background imagery and audio to that of thousands of other videos.  Read More

Its developers say the Realm System is the first gaming solution to incorporate force and ...

Video games have come a long way since the days of Computer Space, Pong and Donkey Kong. Storylines have become richer and more compelling, the leap from two to three-dimensional environments marked the beginnings of open world gameplay and now we've got virtual reality promising to take things to yet another level. Film producer-turned-hardware developer Matt Long is determined to play a part in this continued evolution of gaming technology by bringing physical resistance and force into the mix with his Realm System.  Read More

XON Snow-1 snowboard bindings provide users with feedback on their performance

One factor that snowboarders didn't previously have to consider when choosing bindings was what kind of data they could transmit. With the introduction of the XON Snow-1, however, that's now a factor. The bindings use an array of sensors to provide riders with all sorts of information on their runs, that can be used to improve their skills.  Read More

Tracky's top and pants incorporate 11 accelerometers, along with other sensors

When professional athletes are having their performance analyzed, it's certainly not unheard of for them to wear motion capture suits while training in a lab environment. Coaches and others can then analyze their movements, to see where improvements could be made. Indian startup ProjectPOLE is now offering that same feedback to everyday athletes, with its Tracky motion-tracking sportswear.  Read More

The paths of some of the satellites identified in the study

According to a scientist from the University of Leicester in the UK, the search for missing ships and sea-crossing aircraft – such as Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 – would be much easier if existing satellites were simply used differently. Dr. Nigel Bannister is developing a system in which spacecraft that already keep an eye on the land could also turn their attention to the sea.  Read More

Each tag is about the length of two grains of rice (Photo: PNNL)

In order to study how young fish such as salmon are affected by swimming through hydroelectric dams, scientists have traditionally equipped them with surgically-implanted acoustic tracking tags. Unfortunately, the implantation procedure can harm the fish, plus the weight of the device can affect their behavior. Now, however, a team at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Washington state has developed a much lighter acoustic tag, that can be injected into fish using a needle.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 31,310 articles
Editor's Choice
Product Comparisons