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Time

The Rolex analog speedometer and chronometer for the Bloodhound SSC

Digital electronic displays are a tremendous asset until they give out, then you end up staring at a blank screen having no idea what’s going on. That’s bad enough sitting at a desk, but in a supersonic car blasting across the South African desert, it’s brown trousers time. To avoid this, watch manufacturer Rolex has developed a pair of bespoke analog instruments as backups for the Bloodhound SSC, the jet-powered car being built for an attempt to set a new world land speed record of 1,000 mph (1,609 km/h).  Read More

The Cesium 133 prototype currently sports a carbon fiber case, which keeps its weight down...

There are plenty of atomic watches available that can keep time accurately by receiving a radio signal from an atomic clock, but there hasn't ever been a true atomic wristwatch which boasts its own atomic clock. Until now. Enter the Cesium 133 from Bathys Hawaii, an early steel-bodied prototype of which we first spotted in October 2013.  Read More

The NIST-F2 loses one second in 300 million years

If you’re someone who is happy to spend an hour setting the clock on the microwave because it has to be just right, then the news out of the US Department of Commerce's National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is right up your alley. NIST has announced the launch of a new atomic clock as the official standard for civilian time. Called NIST-F2, it is so accurate that it will lose only one second in 300 million years.  Read More

The Christophe Claret Maestoso

Some upmarket wristwatches are all bells and whistles, while for others their attraction isn’t in what they do, but how they’re made. One case in point is the Christophe Claret Maestoso showcased at Baselworld 2014, which uses a detent escapement – a movement of remarkable accuracy that’s almost impossible to install in a watch.  Read More

Nadir is a watch that defies convention by pointing the hands inwards rather than outwards

We've seen plenty of watches that have tried to do something different from the norm. The watch with one hand, the watch with one hand and no numbers, and every single watch from Tokyo Flash, to cite just three examples. And now we have another, this one being a watch that has the hands pointing inwards rather than outwards.  Read More

The minimalist Durr watch

Time may be constant, but our perception of it is constantly changing. If you're happy and having fun, it tends to pass more quickly than if you're miserable and suffering. Time has also been shown to pass more quickly for older people than younger generations. Wearing a wristwatch doesn't necessarily help us become more aware of the passing of time, but wearing Durr may well do ... By stretching our preconceived ideas of what constitutes a timepiece.  Read More

The blue cloud of strontium at the heart of the world's most precise and stable clock (Pho...

Not satisfied with the accuracy of the "quantum logic clock" (which only gains or loses one second every 3.7 billion years), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and JILA have unveiled an even more precise timekeeper. The strontium lattice clock sets new standards for precision and stability, only gaining or losing one second about every five billion years.  Read More

The Blacklamp Carbon has a simple exterior that hides its rather unique features

The Blacklamp Carbon watch produced by the UK-based Schofield Watch Company lights up in two different, and rather unusual, ways. This goes some way to explaining, but probably cannot justify, the asking price of £9,900 (US$16,000).  Read More

The Visus Watch from Mykonos Design features a stationary hand capable of accurately telli...

Analog watches with just one hand aren't unheard of, but they are still far from the norm. The problem with this novel approach is that accuracy tends to take a back seat. The Visus Watch from Mykonos Design aims to change this.  Read More

Bathys Hawaii's Cesium 133 atomic watch – a smaller model is on its way

With all the fuss over the recent influx of do-everything smartwatches, you would think that a new wristwatch that simply displays the time on an analog face wouldn't cause much of a stir. However, when that watch is described as "atomic" and is claimed to be "the world's most accurate wristwatch," people perk up and take notice. Kauai-based Bathys Hawaii Watch Company has just revealed its first prototype of such a watch, known as the Cesium 133.  Read More

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