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Time

Rolling World Clock hops between time zones with a simple nudge

A smartphone app, an internet search or even some quick calculations are all effective enough ways of working out the time in other locations around the world, but perhaps aren't as elegant as the World Clock from Korean design firm Elevenplus. This stylish timepiece can quickly show you the time in 24 different time zones, needing only a little push in the right direction. Read More

The Ora Unica hides time inside a doodle

The Ora Unico from Nava Design may just be an analog watch, but it's an analog watch that looks like no other on the market. The stainless steel case and leather strap are nothing out of the ordinary, but the face is truly unique. So much so that those who don't know its secret may not be able to read the time. Read More
— Automotive

Bloodhound supersonic car goes old school with Rolex analog instruments

By - May 8, 2014 13 Pictures
Digital electronic displays are a tremendous asset until they give out, then you end up staring at a blank screen having no idea what’s going on. That’s bad enough sitting at a desk, but in a supersonic car blasting across the South African desert, it’s brown trousers time. To avoid this, watch manufacturer Rolex has developed a pair of bespoke analog instruments as backups for the Bloodhound SSC, the jet-powered car being built for an attempt to set a new world land speed record of 1,000 mph (1,609 km/h). Read More
— Science

New US time standard launched with NIST-F2 atomic clock

By - April 9, 2014 3 Pictures
If you’re someone who is happy to spend an hour setting the clock on the microwave because it has to be just right, then the news out of the US Department of Commerce's National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is right up your alley. NIST has announced the launch of a new atomic clock as the official standard for civilian time. Called NIST-F2, it is so accurate that it will lose only one second in 300 million years. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Durr, the faceless watch that vibrates every 5 minutes

By - February 7, 2014 4 Pictures
Time may be constant, but our perception of it is constantly changing. If you're happy and having fun, it tends to pass more quickly than if you're miserable and suffering. Time has also been shown to pass more quickly for older people than younger generations. Wearing a wristwatch doesn't necessarily help us become more aware of the passing of time, but wearing Durr may well do ... By stretching our preconceived ideas of what constitutes a timepiece. Read More
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