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Time

Digital electronic displays are a tremendous asset until they give out, then you end up staring at a blank screen having no idea what’s going on. That’s bad enough sitting at a desk, but in a supersonic car blasting across the South African desert, it’s brown trousers time. To avoid this, watch manufacturer Rolex has developed a pair of bespoke analog instruments as backups for the Bloodhound SSC, the jet-powered car being built for an attempt to set a new world land speed record of 1,000 mph (1,609 km/h). Read More

A smartphone app, an internet search or even some quick calculations are all effective enough ways of working out the time in other locations around the world, but perhaps aren't as elegant as the World Clock from Korean design firm Elevenplus. This stylish timepiece can quickly show you the time in 24 different time zones, needing only a little push in the right direction. Read More

The Ora Unico from Nava Design may just be an analog watch, but it's an analog watch that looks like no other on the market. The stainless steel case and leather strap are nothing out of the ordinary, but the face is truly unique. So much so that those who don't know its secret may not be able to read the time. Read More

There are plenty of atomic watches available that can keep time accurately by receiving a radio signal from an atomic clock, but there hasn't ever been a true atomic wristwatch which boasts its own atomic clock. Until now. Enter the Cesium 133 from Bathys Hawaii, an early steel-bodied prototype of which we first spotted in October 2013. Read More
If you’re someone who is happy to spend an hour setting the clock on the microwave because it has to be just right, then the news out of the US Department of Commerce's National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is right up your alley. NIST has announced the launch of a new atomic clock as the official standard for civilian time. Called NIST-F2, it is so accurate that it will lose only one second in 300 million years. Read More
Some upmarket wristwatches are all bells and whistles, while for others their attraction isn’t in what they do, but how they’re made. One case in point is the Christophe Claret Maestoso showcased at Baselworld 2014, which uses a detent escapement – a movement of remarkable accuracy that’s almost impossible to install in a watch. Read More

We've seen plenty of watches that have tried to do something different from the norm. The watch with one hand, the watch with one hand and no numbers, and every single watch from Tokyo Flash, to cite just three examples. And now we have another, this one being a watch that has the hands pointing inwards rather than outwards. Read More

Time may be constant, but our perception of it is constantly changing. If you're happy and having fun, it tends to pass more quickly than if you're miserable and suffering. Time has also been shown to pass more quickly for older people than younger generations. Wearing a wristwatch doesn't necessarily help us become more aware of the passing of time, but wearing Durr may well do ... By stretching our preconceived ideas of what constitutes a timepiece. Read More
Not satisfied with the accuracy of the "quantum logic clock" (which only gains or loses one second every 3.7 billion years), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and JILA have unveiled an even more precise timekeeper. The strontium lattice clock sets new standards for precision and stability, only gaining or losing one second about every five billion years. Read More

The Blacklamp Carbon watch produced by the UK-based Schofield Watch Company lights up in two different, and rather unusual, ways. This goes some way to explaining, but probably cannot justify, the asking price of £9,900 (US$16,000). Read More

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