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Swimming

— Robotics

Row-bot cleans dirty water and powers itself by eating microbes

Inspired by the water boatman bug, a team at the University of Bristol has created the Row-bot, a robot prototype that is designed to punt itself across the top of the water in dirty ponds or lakes, and "eat" the microbes it scoops up. It then breaks these down in its artificial stomach to create energy to power itself. In this way, it generates enough power to continuously impel itself about to seek out more bacteria to feed upon.

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— Biology

Secret to jellyfish propulsion could be applied to human tech

Until now, scientists weren’t entirely sure how marine life like jellyfish and eels are able to move so effortlessly from point A to point B, using less energy than it takes any other moving life form ever measured. But researchers at the University of South Florida (USF) believe they may have now found the answer. Rather than propel themselves forward by pushing against the water, jellyfish and eels actually suck the water toward them.

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— Sports

OnCourse Goggles designed to keep triathletes swimming straight

If you regularly swim laps in a pool, chances are that you wear goggles so you can follow the lane markers on the bottom. For triathletes swimming in lakes or the sea, however, there are no lane markers. Instead, they have to periodically look up towards marker buoys, and may even then proceed forward in a time- and energy-wasting zig-zaggy pattern. That’s why OnCourse Goggles were created. Using LEDs, they show the wearer how to stay … well, on course.

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— Architecture

Thames Bath project hits Kickstarter

Britain's lidos, or public open-air swimming pools, were once far more numerous and popular than they are today. In recent years though, they've come back into fashion to some extent, with several campaigns to re-open or renovate aging lidos proving successful. Riding this wave is the Thames Bath project, which has recently turned to Kickstarter to raise funds toward a new floating open-air swimming pool on the River Thames. Read More
— Robotics

US Navy tests GhostSwimmer "roboshark"

Should you be swimming in the ocean sometime soon and spot a shark-like dorsal fin cutting through the water towards you, just relax – it might simply be a military robot, that's made to look like a shark. A US Navy team has recently been testing just such a device at its Joint Expeditionary Base East, in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Known as the GhostSwimmer, the robot was developed by Boston Engineering as part of the Navy's Silent NEMO project, which is aimed at creating nature-inspired unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs). Read More
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