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Swimming

Outdoors Review

Review: A snorkel that makes you feel like Aquaman

A swimmer's snorkel can dramatically change the way you bang out laps in the pool. Unlike a regular snorkel, these devices typically have a single tube that extends from a special mask up the center of your head so that you can swim without the need to turn your head from side to side to breathe. Ameo announced that it was fundamentally changing the design of the swimmer's snorkel in 2012 with its Powerbreather model. The company has finally released it and we had a chance to try it out.Read More

Science

Buoys warn swimmers of dirty water

Is the water in your local lake clean enough to swim in today? Currently, the only way to find out is for someone to take a water sample, bring it back to a lab, then report the analysis 24 to 48 hours later. Soon, however, water-sampling buoys anchored off of beaches could provide readings in real time.Read More

Robotics

Row-bot cleans dirty water and powers itself by eating microbes

Inspired by the water boatman bug, a team at the University of Bristol has created the Row-bot, a robot prototype that is designed to punt itself across the top of the water in dirty ponds or lakes, and "eat" the microbes it scoops up. It then breaks these down in its artificial stomach to create energy to power itself. In this way, it generates enough power to continuously impel itself about to seek out more bacteria to feed upon.Read More

Biology

Secret to jellyfish propulsion could be applied to human tech

Until now, scientists weren’t entirely sure how marine life like jellyfish and eels are able to move so effortlessly from point A to point B, using less energy than it takes any other moving life form ever measured. But researchers at the University of South Florida (USF) believe they may have now found the answer. Rather than propel themselves forward by pushing against the water, jellyfish and eels actually suck the water toward them.Read More

Sports

OnCourse Goggles designed to keep triathletes swimming straight

If you regularly swim laps in a pool, chances are that you wear goggles so you can follow the lane markers on the bottom. For triathletes swimming in lakes or the sea, however, there are no lane markers. Instead, they have to periodically look up towards marker buoys, and may even then proceed forward in a time- and energy-wasting zig-zaggy pattern. That's why OnCourse Goggles were created. Using LEDs, they show the wearer how to stay … well, on course.Read More

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