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Surgery

The implants and instruments produced by ConforMIS are tailored to each patient's anatomy

In today's installment of "How 3D Printing is Changing Healthcare Forever," a Massachusetts-based medical device company is forging new ground in knee replacement surgery. A combination of CT imaging, modeling software and 3D printing technology is enabling ConforMIS to offer implants tailored specifically to each patient. The development could help avoid complications that often follow the procedure, such as pain arising from instability of the joint.  Read More

Patient mockup of surgical robot designed to treat epilepsy by entering the brain through ...

Conventional open surgery on the brain involves drilling openings in the skull through which to access the gray matter. But what if the part of the brain needing to be accessed is located at the bottom of the brain as is the case with treating severe epileptic seizures? Generally it means more drilling. Now engineers at Vanderbilt University have developed a surgical robot that uses an alternative point of entry – the cheek.  Read More

Robots and space technology may soon be saving children's lives thanks to KidsArm, a robot...

The technology that built (and continues to maintain) the International Space Station can now be used to help heal sick children. KidsArm, a robotic arm designed for delicate pediatric surgery, was built by the same companies that are behind the robotic arms used by astronauts to construct the ISS.  Read More

Surgeons used a 3D-printed implant to replace a cancerous vertebra in a 12-year-old boy

According to market-based research firm IDTechEx, the medical and dental market for 3D-printers is set to grow from US$141 million to $868 million by the year 2025. And when you consider the recent spate of groundbreaking medical procedures, it is pretty easy to see why. The latest surgery brought to you by the seemingly endless possibilities of 3D-printing comes at the hands of doctors at China's Peking University Third Hospital, who produced a custom implant to replace a cancerous vertebra in the neck of a 12-year-old boy.  Read More

Recent surgery using a 3D-printed spine cage has been hailed a success

While the impacts of 3D printing are indeed far-reaching, the medical industry stands to gain as much as any from this fast-growing technology. Following in the footsteps of patient-specific surgeries and treatments such as skull and jaw implants, as well as custom-molded mouthpieces for sufferers of sleep apnea is the first spinal fusion surgery performed using a 3D-printed spine cage.  Read More

Quadriplegic Ian Burkhart has been given the ability to move his fingers and hand with his...

In what is being touted as a world first, a quadriplegic man has been given the ability to move his fingers and hand with his own thoughts thanks to the implantation of an electronic device in his brain and muscle stimulation sleeve. Part of a neurostimulation system dubbed "Neurobridge," the technology essentially bypasses the damaged spinal cord and reconnects the brain directly to the muscles.  Read More

Orbix is offering a new type of breast-lift procedure that supposedly offers better-lastin...

A new procedure promises to lift and support women's breasts with better-lasting results than traditional methods. The Orbix Breast Support System uses thin silicone straps attached to the ribs to provide support. Orbix says the technique "eliminates breast re-sagging and minimizes scarring."  Read More

A nanoparticle-based surgical adhesive might soon take the place of sutures, staples or po...

In the ongoing quest to develop better ways of sealing wounds within the body, scientists have created surgical adhesives inspired by porcupine quills, mussels and slugs. Not all good ideas have to come from the animal kingdom, however. Recently, French researchers have had success in repairing internal organs using an adhesive solution that incorporates either silica or iron oxide nanoparticles.  Read More

The final Hemosep, developed using 3D-printed prototype parts

During surgery, patients' blood is often "spilt." Such blood can be returned to the body, so long as it has been properly processed to ensure that it is not tainted. The Brightwave Hemosep autotransfusion machine can do this – and its prototyping costs have been cut by 96 percent via 3D printing.  Read More

The engineered cartilage was grown from the patient's own cells and could provide a less-i...

Researchers from Switzerland's University of Basel have performed the first successful nose reconstruction surgery using engineered cartilage grown in the laboratory. The cartilage was spawned form the patient's own cells in an approach that could circumvent the need for more invasive surgeries.  Read More

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