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Surfing

Marine

Waterwolf electric surfboard speeds over lakes and rivers

Not every surfer is lucky enough to live near a world-class break. In fact, many would-be surfers live hundreds of miles from the nearest piece of coast. For them, the new MXP-3 from Germany's Waterwolf represents the chance to transform the local lazy lake or river into a riveting surfer's playground. Part surfboard, part personal watercraft, the MXP-3 zips clean across flat water at speeds up to 21 mph (35 km/h). Read More

Sports

Trace sensor tracks your tricks and airs for skate, snow and surf

There's no shortage of sports performance trackers, but most of them are worn on the body. Watches and glasses simply aren't comfortable for every sport, or every athlete. The Trace action sports activity monitor being developed by California's ActiveReplay pulls the hardware off the body and puts it somewhere more comfortable – on the board. It also adds some tracking functions geared specifically for board sports. Read More

Marine

SAMS wetsuits make surfers look less tasty

Worldwide, around 100 people are attacked by sharks each year. The anxiety this produces isn't helped by the fact that traditional black wetsuits make divers and surfers look like seals, and it’s not a good idea to dress up as a shark’s favorite snack before going into the water. Australian company Shark Attack Mitigation Systems (SAMS) is developing wetsuits designed to deter shark attacks rather than ring the dinner gong by using disruptive patterns that sharks have trouble seeing, or that make them think twice about attacking. Read More

Sports

Waveskate surfs both waves and pavement

Man has made many attempts at bringing the smooth, Mother Nature-powered flow of surfing to dry land. The ARIS Blade Runner and SurfSkate are two of the attempts that have come to our attention most recently, but there are plenty of others. The big sticking point is that you just can't magically transform hot, cracked asphalt into cool, smooth ocean breaks. But you can ride that asphalt with an actual surfboard, as the Waveskate demonstrates beyond the shadow of all doubt. Read More

Aircraft

U.S. Air Force goes vortex surfing to cut fuel consumption

The United States Air Force is taking flying lessons from geese and spiny lobsters. This may seem like the mother of all bureaucratic errors, but there’s actually some pretty solid science behind it. In exploiting a phenomenon known as “vortex surfing,” the USAF has found that by having C-17 cargo planes flying in formation, it can reduce fuel consumption by up to ten percent. Read More

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