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Submarine


— Marine

Europe's first ultra-deep-sea robotic glider to monitor deep sea pollution

By - July 18, 2015 2 Pictures

The deep sea is the new frontier for mining, oil exploration, and other industrial activities as they leave the continental shelves for areas miles beneath the ocean surface. Along with this comes greater dangers to the environment, which will require constant monitoring. To provide the needed eyes, Britain's National Oceanography Centre (NOC) and partners are developing the BRIDGES Glider. As Europe’s first ultra-deep-sea robot glider, the craft is capable of reaching 75 percent of the world's oceans to depths of up to 5,000 meters.

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— Marine

Seawolf sub takes your GoPro on an undersea voyage

By - June 15, 2015 2 Pictures

While there are plenty of aerial drones that show us our surroundings from up in the air, there are far fewer remote-control devices that let us see what's lurking beneath the surface of the water. Although the Aquabotix Hydroview is one, at around US$3,000 it certainly isn't cheap. While still not inexpensive, the newest version of the TTRobotix Seawolf is considerably less pricey – partly because it incorporates the user's existing GoPro actioncam.

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— Marine

Submersible photographs WW2 Japanese sub's long-lost airplane hangar

By - April 29, 2015 6 Pictures
Until the 1960s, Japan's three I-400-class subs were the largest submarines ever built. They were so large, in fact, that they could each carry and launch three Aichi M6A Seiran amphibious aircraft. The idea was that the submarines could stealthily bring the planes to within striking distance of US coastal cities, where they could then take off and conduct bombing runs. Now, for the first time since it was scuttled at the end of World War II, one of the sunken subs' aircraft hangars has been photographed. Read More
— Environment

ROV assesses thickness of oil slicks from underneath

By - March 17, 2015 2 Pictures
When people are attempting to clean up oil spills at sea, one of the key things they need to know is the amount of oil that's been spilled – among other things, this will determine the amount of dispersant or other agents that are used. In order to make that process easier and more accurate, scientists from the Virginia Institute of Marine Science have developed a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) that does the job by measuring the thickness of oil slicks from below the surface. Read More
— Science

Royal Navy subs provide insights for Arctic science

By - March 1, 2015 1 Picture
The National Oceanography Centre in the UK has used data on the Arctic Ocean gathered by Royal Navy submarines to study the effects of a possible future shrinking of the ice cap. This meeting of oceanography and military intelligence has seen declassified data from the 1990s analyzed to gain insights into how diminished ice cover affects turbulence in arctic waters. Read More
— Space

NASA releases details of Titan submarine concept

By - February 10, 2015 4 Pictures
Now that NASA has got the hang of planetary rovers, the space agency is looking at sending submarines into space around the year 2040. At the recent 2015 NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Symposium in Cocoa Beach, Florida, NASA scientists and engineers presented a study of the Titan Submarine Phase I Conceptual Design, which outlines a possible mission to Saturn's largest moon, Titan, where the unmanned submersible would explore the seas of liquid hydrocarbons at the Titanian poles. Read More
— Science

Underwater vehicle uses a balloon to dart like an octopus

By - February 5, 2015 1 Picture
When you inflate a balloon and then release it without tying the valve shut, it certainly shoots away quickly. Octopi utilize the same basic principle, although they suck in and then rapidly expel water. An international team of scientists have now replicated that system in a soft-bodied miniature underwater vehicle, which could pave the way for very quickly-accelerating full-size submersibles. Read More
— Science

Robot sub beats nets for discovering what lurks at the bottom of the sea

By - January 13, 2015 2 Pictures
Curious about what's living on the deep sea floor? Well, the Autosub6000 AUV (autonomous underwater vehicle) is helping us find out. Led by Dr. Kirsty Morris, a team at the UK's National Oceanography Centre (NOC) has equipped one of the unmanned submarines with a high-resolution photographic system. As a result, it's claimed to be far more effective at identifying deep-sea life than the usual approach of scientific trawling. Read More
— Robotics

Sea turtle robot charges its own batteries

By - December 30, 2014 2 Pictures
They may be slow on land, but when they're in the water, sea turtles are fast and maneuverable – qualities that are also desirable in underwater robots. Additionally, the robotic equivalent of a turtle's streamlined shell could be stuffed full of electronic components and batteries. It shouldn't come as a surprise, therefore, that both ETH Zurich and the ARROWS project have recently created their own turtle-bots. Now, the National University of Singapore has announced its own entry in the field, that can self-charge its batteries while at sea. Read More
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