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Submarine

Military

BAE Systems' Archerfish hunts down sea mines

The animal known as the archerfish has a unique claim to fame – it shoots down and then eats airborne insects by spitting a stream of water at them. Well, BAE Systems' Archerfish ROV (remote-operated vehicle) is a little different. It locates and then blows up sea mines, by shooting them with an explosive charge. Read More

Military

Trident ballistic missile flies with first 3D-printed part

Three-dimensional printing has been applied to handguns, rockets, hypersonic jet engines, bicycles, ears, objects d'art, and now submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBM). Lockheed Martin has announced that the first 3D printed components for an SLBM flew this week on test launches of three unarmed US Navy Trident II D5 Fleet Ballistic Missiles from a submerged submarine in the Atlantic Ocean. The component tests, which were conducted from March 14 to 16, are part of Lockheed's program to create an all-digital manufacturing process.Read More

Military

HMS Artful uses new "brain" to fire torpedo

The Royal Navy's latest and most advanced nuclear submarine, HMS Artful, has successfully fired its first test torpedo using a state-of-the-art "brain." According to the British Ministry of Defence, the 7,400-tonne hunter-killer used the new Command Combat System to integrate data from its suite of sensors to track and hit the moving target with an unarmed practice weapon. The Artful is the third of the Astute class submarines and is the first to have the CCS installed.Read More

Military

DARPA readies unmanned ACTUV sub hunter for sea trials

The day of the robot warship may be a lot closer than many people think with DARPA announcing that it will christen its Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) Continuous Trail Unmanned Vessel (ACTUV) on April 9 at the Swan Island shipyard in Portland, Oregon. Also known as the Seahunter, the 139 ft (42 m) long vessel is designed to track potentially hostile submarines for months at a time without a crew.Read More

Marine

DEDAVE may be the autonomous underwater vehicle for everyone else

The Ford Model T wasn't the first car to ever be commercially available, but it was one of the very first to be mass-produced. This meant that its price could be kept relatively low, allowing for purchase by people who would otherwise have never been able to afford an automobile. Well, the DEDAVE could be to autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) what the Model T was to cars. Created by Germany's Fraunhofer Institute for Optronics, System Technologies and Image Exploitation, it's claimed to be "the world's first autonomous underwater vehicle to be developed from the outset with a view to series production."Read More

Robotics

Robot uses heat to strip rubber off nuclear submarines

In 2007, International Climbing Machines (ICM) unveiled its Climber robot, which can scale walls and rounded surfaces using a patented seal system. Now, it's trying to interest the US Navy in using robots to take over the nasty job of stripping away the rubber anti-sonar cladding from the nuclear submarine fleet using a method that is both cheaper and safer than current procedures.Read More

Marine

Trident ROV may be that underwater drone you've been looking for

Aerial drones are great for providing a bird’s eye view of our world. That said, some people are more interested in seeing a fish’s eye view of their local seacoast or lake. Previously, such folks had to build their own underwater remote-operated vehicle (ROV). Three years ago, San Francisco startup OpenROV made things a little easier for them, by offering an ROV kit that users put together themselves. Now, the company is crowdfunding the fully-assembled Trident ROV, which can reportedly be "flown" through the water.

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