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Stress

— Health and Wellbeing

Snug Vest addresses anxiety by inflating

By - March 31, 2015 6 Pictures
Sometimes, when you're feeling anxious, all you need is a hug. But the thought of actually hugging someone might instil yet more anxiety. That's where the Snug Vest comes in. It uses a clinical method known as deep pressure therapy to essentially simulate a hug, which has been found to help reduce anxiety and stress and to be an effective treatment for people with autism or ADHD. Read More
— Space

New study highlights the importance of understanding sleep deprivation in astronauts

By - August 12, 2014 2 Pictures
The recently-released results of a study carried out by researchers from the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, and the University of Colorado have revealed the extent of the sleep deprivation suffered by astronauts over the course of a long-term mission in Earth-orbit. This study and others like it are the result of an increasing effort undertaken by agencies around the world to study the physiological and psychological impacts of a permanent human presence in space. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Blood test could indicate predisposition to suicide

By - July 30, 2014 1 Picture
While there are a wide range of scenarios that may cause a person to take their own life, the fact is that in a given situation, some people will do so whereas others won't. Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine now believe that this difference can largely be traced to a genetic mutation in the people who are more likely to commit suicide. What's more, this mutation can be detected via a blood test. Read More
— Science

Paint-on "sensing skin" is designed to detect damage in concrete structures

By - July 4, 2014 1 Picture
Although concrete structures such as bridges are now often built with strain sensors embedded within them, that certainly hasn't always been the case. In order to alert authorities to cracks developing within these older structures, one solution involves attaching sensors to them. Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Eastern Finland are working on an alternative, however – an electrically-conductive paint-on "sensing skin." Read More
— Bicycles

"Mind-reading" MindRider bike helmet wants you to have a sweet ride

By - June 13, 2014 3 Pictures
While many people will tell you that commuting by bicycle is less stressful than driving, the fact remains that it can still be ... well, stressful. While you could try to determine the least-taxing route by jotting down how tense you are in which places, doing so could get pretty complicated. The MindRider, however, is designed to make that process easier. It's a "mind-reading" bike helmet that lets you create so-called mind maps of your travels. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

ParentGuardian helps parents of ADHD kids keep their stress in check

By - June 4, 2014 2 Pictures
It can be hard enough for parents to maintain a cool head when dealing with an angry child at the best of times, but things can get much more difficult when that child has ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). That's why scientists at Microsoft Research and the University of California, San Diego have created ParentGuardian. It combines a wrist-worn sensor and an app, to monitor parents' stress levels and deliver real-time coping strategies. Read More
— Science

Color-changing film could revolutionize product development

By - May 1, 2014 1 Picture
Whether you're manufacturing cars, phones, sports equipment or pretty much anything else, a key part of the design process involves measuring the amount of mechanical stress experienced by different parts of the product. Thanks to research being conducted at the University of California, Riverside, doing so may soon be much easier. Scientists there have created a film that changes color when subjected to pressure, making it easy to see where objects coated with the film may need reinforcement. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

The doctor is in: Virtual therapist to help treat stress disorders

By - May 30, 2013 4 Pictures
Researchers at the University of Southern California’s Institute for Creative Sciences (ICT) are developing a virtual therapist that can identify signs of depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Bringing together machine learning, natural language processing and computer vision technologies, the SimSensei project is aimed at helping military personnel and their families, while reducing the stigma that is often associated with seeking help. Read More
— Science

Take a deep breath – scientists working on a stress breath test

By - March 5, 2013 1 Picture
Most of us are able to let other people know that we’re stressed, simply by telling them. For people such as those suffering from Alzheimer’s, however, it can be difficult to express such a thought. That’s why UK scientists at Loughborough University and Imperial College London are developing a new test that can determine someone’s stress levels by analyzing their breath. Read More

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