Photokina 2014 highlights

Speedo

Nemesis Fins are designed to let you swim like a whale ... sort of

If you've ever seen a humpback whale's fins, you might have noticed that they have knobby bits along the front edge. These are known as tubercles, and they cause the water to flow over the fins in such a way that extra lift is created. They've been copied in efforts to produce better wind turbines, undersea turbines, helicopter rotor blades ... and now, Speedo swim fins.  Read More

A free-surface simulation of the forces experienced when diving helped in the design of Sp...

A controversy during the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics was Speedo's introduction of its drag reducing LZR Racer swimming outfit. The suit worked so well that it was subsequently outlawed by the Fédération Internationale de Natation (FINA) as the technological equivalent of doping - it gave too large an advantage. Now, with the help of ANSYS simulation software, and just in time for the 2012 London Summer Olympics, Speedo has introduced the Fastskin3 racing system, which offers a new and apparently legal approach to drag reduction during competitive swimming.  Read More

The Speedo Aquacoach is a swimmer's watch that automatically keeps track of data such as l...

Serious road cyclists tend to like using cycling computers (or "cyclometers") to provide them with performance data such as their speed, cadence, distance traveled and power output. Swimmers can also get their pruned-up hands on tech that makes keeping tabs on training sessions much easier and this example from Speedo will appeal to pool-goers for one reason in particular - it automatically counts laps. The Speedo Aquacoach watch uses technology developed by UK-based Swimovate to automatically detect the stroke and - along with counting laps - calculate distance, speed, number of strokes and calories burned.  Read More

The Speedo Aquabeat comes in lime green, hot pink, black and gray

Speedo's offering in the waterproof MP3 player arena - the Aquabeat - is submersible to three meters, weighs in at only 35g and is easily attached to your sports gear so you can have beats as you zig-zag at high-speed down the mountain or cut laps at the pool.  Read More

We've come a long way ... from shocking in the early 1900s (left) to blase in 2010, swimsu...

Swimwear fashion has progressed steadily over the past 100 or so years (if you discount Borat’s mankini). Design has moved from neck-to-knees woolen garments that women were encouraged to bathe in at the beach, to men’s Speedos, to skimpy Brazilian thongs, to Daniel Craig’s James Bond swimmer boxer trunks, to full body racing ‘buoyancy’ suits for Olympians. Who could forget screen sirens Esther Williams, Jane Mansfield and Marilyn Monroe posing in their swimsuits? To celebrate Australia’s contribution to the swimwear industry – in design and materials – a comprehensive exhibition titled "Exposed! The story of swimwear" is traversing that country, appearing at State museums.  Read More

Ryan Lochte (USA) swims in the new Speedo LZR RACER

February 14, 2008 Following three years of research that included input from NASA, tests on more than 100 different fabrics and suit designs, and body scans of more than 400 elite swimmers, Speedo has launched its most hydro-dynamically advanced - and fastest - swimsuit to date. The SPEEDO® LZR RACER™ is made from a unique lightweight, water repellent and fast-drying fabric that has been developed to reduce drag and help hold the swimmer’s body in a more streamlined shape. Speedo says the suit has been independently tested as the "world's fastest", a claim that translates to up to 5% more efficiency for swimmers and hopefully, at least for Michael Phelps and other elite athletes donning the suit in Beijing later in the year, more gold medals.  Read More

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