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Skyscrapers

New skyscrapers in the City of London (Image: Hayes Davidson for NLA)

Some are sharp, some are boxy, some tubular. Some will be built in pairs, groups of three or clusters. More than 230 new towers are being built or planned for London, making Renzo Piano’s Shard look like a modest proposal and St Paul’s almost quaint.  Read More

First Place - Vernacular Versatility by Yong Ju Lee (United States)

The winners of the 2014 eVolo skyscraper competition were announced in March. Now in its ninth year, the contest aims to recognize outstanding ideas for vertical living. This year's entries included wooden structures, sky cities and buildings that grow.  Read More

GDS Architects has received the green light for its award winning 450 meter (1,476 ft) hig...

Korean architectural studio GDS Architects has received the green light for its award winning 450 meter high Tower Infinity design. To be built near the Incheon International Airport just outside of Seoul, Tower Infinity will become the "world's first invisible tower" and third highest observation deck.  Read More

Light reflected from an 37-story skyscraper under-construction in London could be to blame...

According to a report by the BBC, light reflected from an 37-story skyscraper under-construction in London could be responsible for melting parts of a Jaguar parked nearby.  Read More

The Avis Magica skyscraper concept (Image: Alex Sandulescu)

Bucharest-based architectural studio Amarada has unveiled a new skyscraper concept. Dubbed Avis Magica, the futuristic building features a vertical aquarium, and produces its own electricity via novel wind-harnessing "feathers."  Read More

Workers on site have downed tools, local media reports

Within mere days of the announcement that ground had been broken on China's super-tall Sky City skyscraper, local media is reporting that workers have downed tools.  Read More

Telus Sky Tower is scheduled for completion in late 2017 (Image: BIG)

Danish architectural firm Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has announced it is planning to build a new tower block in downtown Calgary, Canada. The Telus Sky Tower, which BIG intends to have LEED Platinum certified, will feature a mixture of residential, office, and retail spaces, spread over 750,000 sq ft (70,000 sq m).  Read More

Could Berg C.F. Møller's vision prove a blueprint for getting the wooden skyscraper right?...

Skyscrapers dominate the skylines of our major cities, offering more urban density and greater flexibility than smaller buildings. However, concrete- and steel-based tall structures require huge amounts of energy for their construction, which comes at a significant environmental cost. This can be mitigated by incorporating technologies such as solar power, passive cooling systems and efficient lighting into the design, but what if we could go even further and build skyscrapers using sustainable materials? Herein lies the impetus behind recent research into the efficacy of wooden skyscrapers.  Read More

A new lightweight hoisting line known as UltraRope could double the current maximum height...

As architects continue to design taller and taller buildings, a certain limitation of elevators is going to become more of a problem – using traditional steel lifting cables, they can’t go farther than 500 meters (1,640 ft) in one vertical run. Any higher, and the weight of all the cable required is simply too much. Currently in the world's few buildings that are over 500 meters tall, passengers must transfer from one elevator line to another, part way up. Thanks to a new lightweight material known as UltraRope, however, elevators should now be able to travel up to one kilometer (3,281 ft) continuously.  Read More

The Klik building system is designed for residential projects of all sizes (Image: Elenber...

With Klik, Australian companies Elenberg Fraser and Unitised Building have come up with a prefabricated modular building system they claim is equally suited to knocking up a quick skyscraper as it is a modern, designer house. It makes sense, then, that the product is pitched at developers, architects and would-be homeowners, and that the multiple choice procurement procedure is identical for each. If you can tick a box, you can design a Klik building, more or less.  Read More

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