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Sensors


— Good Thinking

Density sensor lets you avoid the rush at your favorite haunts

By - August 4, 2015 7 Pictures

If you've ever been on your sofa and wondered how long you might have to queue for a bike at the gym or how long the wait is for a table at your favorite restaurant, then the Density sensor could provide the answer. Designed to be attached to the entrance of a premises, the sensor captures people's comings and goings to provide real-time and historical data about the volume of traffic passing through.

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— Medical

Silk-based functional inks put biosensor data on your fingertips

By - July 27, 2015

Although we've seen "bio-inks" that allow sensors to be drawn directly on a person's skin and other surfaces to gauge things like glucose levels, functional inks such as this are usually heat-sensitive, meaning they aren't suitable for use in inkjet printers. Researchers at Tufts University have now developed silk-based inks containing bacteria-sensing agents that can withstand the rigors of inkjet printing, opening the door much wider for printing biomolecules.

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— Around The Home Review

CubeSensors review: These little cubes want to make you and your home healthier

By - July 1, 2015 29 Pictures

In a bid to improve their lifestyles an increasing number of people are turning to sensor-toting wearables, but your environment can be just as important as your body. CubeSensors are sensor-packed devices which monitor external factors and give advice to improve your relaxation, productivity or, in conjunction with a Jawbone or Fitbit tracker, sleep quality. Never missing the chance to sleep in the name of work, we recently spent some quality time with the little cubes.

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— Health and Wellbeing

Nox Smart Sleep System offers suggestions to improve slumber

By - June 30, 2015 7 Pictures

Earlier this year, China's Sleepace successfully crowdfunded and shipped a 2 mm thick smart strap that lays on the bed and monitors a user's sleep time, heart rate and breathing, body movement and sleep cycles. The RestOn then sends the collected data to a companion app running on a Bluetooth-paired smartphone for analysis. Now the company has added a smart light to the system called the Nox, which works in conjunction with the RestOn to help monitor, track and improve sleep quality.

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— Wearable Electronics

DrumPants as a trigger-activated communication system

By - May 22, 2015 7 Pictures

DrumPants, the wireless device that converts your pants into a wearable MIDI controller and music sequencer, can now bring a different kind of music to the ears of those around you. Its creators have recently started a beta test program that uses DrumPants triggers (sensor strips that wirelessly connect to a control box) to control lights and doors and to give a voice to those who have none. People with injuries or disorders that limit their ability to speak can tap the trigger on their body or wheelchair to activate an app that reads out loud any customizable statements or text messages, thereby enabling them to communicate more effectively with others.

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— Military

BAE Systems combines night vision goggles with thermal targeting

By - May 5, 2015

In military parlance, the job of a soldier is to find, fix, and finish the enemy. However, this is a bit difficult when the soldier has to fumble with different scopes while keeping eyes on the target. To simplify things, BAE Systems is developing a combination night vision and thermal imaging system that not only allows soldiers to rapidly acquire and engage targets in all weather and lighting, but also to remotely aim their weapons without looking through the sights.

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— Military

World's first military blast test dummy to join the US Army

By - April 11, 2015 3 Pictures
For something commonly called a "dummy," the mannequins used in crash tests are surprisingly sophisticated and so specialized that they're not much use out of automotive safety labs. When the US Army went looking for a dummy of its own, it had to go back to square one by awarding a contract to California-based Diversified Technical Systems (DTS) to help develop the first instrumented dummy designed for military vehicle blast testing. Read More
— Science

Inkjet printers could produce paper sensors that identify dangerous food and water contaminants

By - April 9, 2015 2 Pictures
Sensors that identify infectious disease and food contaminants may soon be printed on paper using ordinary office inkjet printers. Researchers at McMaster University have developed a prototype that could lead to a commercial product in the next few years which helps doctors and scientists in the field quickly detect certain types of cancer or bacterial and respiratory infections or monitor toxin levels in water. Read More
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