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Sensor

50 kW CO2 laser in action (Photo: Laser Effects Test Facility - US Government)

A group of researchers at NIST working with engineers from Colorado-based Scientech has developed a new approach to measuring laser power using a mirror and a scale. This method, which measures the force on the mirror driven by the radiation pressure of the laser light, presents a more rugged and more portable solution than current meters.  Read More

Gizmag goes hands-on with the Creative Senz3D at IFA

Creative is taking on the might of Microsoft's Kinect with the Senz3D Interactive Gesture Camera. Marketed as the "future of PC interaction," the Senz3D features advanced depth sensor technology, and dual array microphones for voice recognition. Gizmag was on the scene to take it for a brief whirl.  Read More

The board-mounted Trace action sports monitor enables advanced tracking functions like tri...

There's no shortage of sports performance trackers, but most of them are worn on the body. Watches and glasses simply aren't comfortable for every sport, or every athlete. The Trace action sports activity monitor being developed by California's ActiveReplay pulls the hardware off the body and puts it somewhere more comfortable – on the board. It also adds some tracking functions geared specifically for board sports.  Read More

The Quick Trainer consists of an iOS device, Bluetooth transmitter and disposable sensor

A new toilet-training device developed by researchers at the University of Rochester combines a wearable sensor pad, Bluetooth technology, an iOS device and accompanying app to help toilet train intellectually disabled children. Rather than just providing entertainment like the iPotty, the Quick Trainer issues an alert the moment the child starts to pee, so adults can take them to the toilet and encourage them to use it. If all goes well, they are rewarded with treats to encourage them to head to the toilet the next time the need arises.  Read More

Modern tech can help keep pets safe and healthy

Human beings aren’t the only ones donning ever-more powerful wearable electronic devices. Our four-legged friends have an increasing array of smart collars from which to choose. Two cases in point are the Whistle, an exercise tracker for your pooch, and Tagg, a GPS tracker designed to ensure your beloved pet doesn’t end up in the lost dogs’ home.  Read More

The portable prototype that detects if you're burning fat by analyzing your breath (Photo:...

While there's no shortage of breathalyzers capable of detecting if you’ve had one too many drinks, a prototype device developed by researchers at NTT DOCOMO Research Laboratories analyzes your breath to detect if your body is burning fat. Besides letting users know if that exercise regime is actually shedding some pounds, its creators say the portable sensor could be helpful for diabetics and those trying to lose weight manage their daily diet.  Read More

Initial prototypes of the 'blood pressure watch' with the strap made from piezo-resistive ...

Blood pressure is one of the main vital signs, measuring the pressure of the blood upon the walls of blood vessels as it is pumped around the body by the heart. High blood pressure, or hypertension, places increased stress on the heart and can be an indicator of other potentially fatal health problems, such as stroke, heart attack, and heart failure. Most people will have had their blood pressure tested using a sphygmomanometer on a visit to the doctor, but a new wristband device is set to provide a more convenient and continuous way to keep a watch for signs of trouble.  Read More

Assistant Professor Wang Qijie from NTU’s School of Electrical & Electronic Engineering (P...

A team of scientists at Nanyang Technological University (NTU) in Singapore has developed a new image sensor from graphene that promises to improve the quality of images captured in low light conditions. In tests, NTU claims it has proved to be 1,000 times more sensitive to light than existing complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) or charge-coupled device (CCD) camera sensors in addition to operating at much lower voltages, consequently using 10 times less energy.  Read More

Stanford University researchers have developed a new, wearable sensor that could revolutio...

Researchers have developed a new type of wearable sensor that could greatly improve the accuracy and practicality of heart monitoring. Developed by Zhenan Bao, a professor of chemical engineering at Stanford University, the paper-thin, stamp-sized sensor is made with flexible organic materials and can be worn under an adhesive bandage on the wrist to monitor the pulse.  Read More

This prototype implant can detect up to five proteins and organic acids at once (Photo: EP...

Blood tests usually involve drawing some blood out of the body. Now scientists from the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) have developed an implant that allows blood to be analyzed from within the body, with results then transmitted wirelessly to a computer. While still at the experimental stage, the device could make it easier for health care providers to monitor the chronically ill and provide more personalized treatment to cancer patients.  Read More

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