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Sensor

The sensor makes use of modified carbon nanotubes in order to detect decay in meat (Image:...

A team of MIT chemists has developed a small sensor that's capable of telling consumers whether the meat in their refrigerators is safe to eat. The team believes that the inexpensive device, which makes use of modified carbon nanotubes, could help cut down on food waste.  Read More

The infrared sensor could be used for medical scans, such as this Optical Coherence Tomogr...

The digital infrared sensor installed on the ESA’s Proba-V satellite is being adapted for use back home. While it’s currently being used to provide fresh pictures of the entirety of Earth’s flora every two days, its creators believe it’s well suited to less exotic applications, such as scanning for skin diseases and spotting defects in production lines.  Read More

The 'bionic reconstruction' procedure involves reading electrical activity from transplant...

Researchers from the Medical University of Vienna have developed a technique that allows amputees to control a robotic prosthesis with their mind when there's no neural connection left to exploit between the brain and the part of the hand that remains. Called "bionic reconstruction," the procedure was applied to three patients who were able to successfully use the prosthesis to undertake routine activities, thereby improving their quality of life.  Read More

BlackBox revealed its Linx IAS at CES 2015

Concussions – or at least concussion discussions – are all the rage lately, particularly in relation to professional sports leagues like the NFL. BlackBox Biometrics is adding to the discussion with a small, lightweight sensor designed to track concussive forces. Derived from the company's military blast force sensor, the consumer-grade Linx IAS straps to the head via a beanie or headband and measures impacts, providing an easy-read analysis that can help athletes identify concussions.  Read More

The second-generation Tagg GPS Plus will push notifications to an owner's phone if their p...

The developers of pet tracking device Tagg have fronted up to this week's CES in Las Vegas with a refined version of its smart collar, shedding a little bulk and incorporating a temperature sensor to let you know when your hound might be getting a little hot under the collar.  Read More

The Ice Harbor Dam in Washington state where Sensor Fish testing is done

It’s a tough row to hoe for young salmon in the Pacific Northwest as they make their perilous journey from upriver to the ocean. Besides hungry birds and sea lions, the regions many hydroelectric dams and their swirling turbines produce manmade currents and other obstacles that make it challenging for the fish to navigate. But now with the help of an artificial Senor Fish created by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), existing larger dams and newer, smaller hydroelectric facilities can become more fish-friendly.  Read More

The skin-like patch changes color as it detects changes in temperature of the skin's surfa...

Researchers from Northwestern University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a health monitor capable of tracking heart and skin condition while worn discretely on the skin. Measuring around 5 cm squared (0.8 in sq), the patch is designed to be inconspicuous and alert the user to conditions ranging from dry skin to cardiovascular problems.  Read More

The CSIRO's HeatWave is a handheld 3D thermal imaging prototype

Thermal imaging has proven itself to be a useful adjunct to physical testing in areas including engineering, health, and agriculture. Until now, however, conventional 3D thermal imaging use has largely been restricted due to the specialized technical knowledge required to operate it and interpret the results. To address this, Australia's CSIRO has developed a prototype tool called HeatWave that is a lightweight, high-resolution 3D scanner that is claimed to be not only easy to carry, but easy to use as well.  Read More

A prototype sensor developed at UW is designed to be permanently placed in a person's eye ...

The fluid pressure inside the eye, known as intraocular pressure (IOP), is an important metric for evaluating a person's risk of glaucoma. There are currently two different ways to measure IOP, both of which require a trip to the ophthalmologist. A prototype sensor developed by engineers at the University of Washington is designed to be placed permanently in a person's eye to track changes in eye pressure and more effectively manage the disease.  Read More

Vessyl is a smart cup that analyzes liquids to tell you what you're drinking

At first glance, "Vessyl" looks like an ultra-modern, but relatively ordinary, 13 oz (385 ml) mug. However, pour something into it and it becomes extraordinary: not only will it identify what type of drink it has in it, but Vessyl will also tell you its dietary content, such as sugar, protein, calories, fat, caffeine – even identifying the beverage by name – then take all of those results and synchronize them to your smartphone.  Read More

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