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Satellite


— Space

NASA's GPM satellite tested and ready to go

Control of NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement Core satellite (GPM) has been handed over to the team of engineers who will maintain operational control of the piece of equipment for the remainder of its life in space. The GPM mission, launched on February 27 atop a Japanese manufactured H-IIA rocket, will work in tandem with a constellation of pre-existing satellites with the objective of creating a unified measurement of rain and snow-fall on a global scale. Read More
— Space

ESA endeavours to understand the unpredictable tumbling of space debris

As part of its Clean Space Initiative, the ESA is planning a satellite salvage mission called e.DeOrbit that would use a satellite to net space debris and remove it from low Earth orbit. To capture such debris using an autonomous system, it needs to be targeted effectively, which is difficult when the debris is tumbling unpredictably. To fine tune the design of the e.DeOrbit mission, the ESA will commission a study to shed light on why space debris tumbles the way it does. Read More
— Telecommunications

Yaliny wants to turn any smartphone into a satellite phone

Visit an area outside of your cell network, take a vacation in a different country, or play a certain augmented reality game requiring you to have a constant high speed data connection, and congratulations, you’ll have an instant reminder of the current limitations of cellular networks. The Russian company Yaliny ambitiously hopes to help consumers circumvent traditional providers with Yaliny’s own network of satellites and an intermediary device called the Yaliny Point which will work with most smartphones, all for a promised US$150 for the hardware and $10 monthly thereafter. Read More
— Space

B612 Foundation highlights the risk of city-destroying asteroids

The California-based B612 Foundation has released a video displaying the distribution of 26 multi-kiloton asteroid impacts known to have struck the Earth since the year 2000. Many of the impacts – detected by a network of satellites operated by the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization – exploded with a force greater than that of the city-leveling bomb dropped on Hiroshima, which had an explosive yield of 15 kilotons. Read More
— Aircraft

StratoBus seeks to occupy the midpoint between airship and satellite

Satellites may be very useful for communications, navigation and other applications, but they're awfully expensive to build and launch, and once they're in orbit ... well, there's no reusing them. That's why a consortium led by Thales Alenia Space is developing the StratoBus. It's a planned autonomous airship that can be launched like a regular blimp, but that will be able to hover at an altitude of 20 km (12 miles) – that's up in the stratosphere, hence the name. Read More
— Space

Lockheed-Martin introduces 100 percent refund or refly program for ATLAS payloads

Lockheed-Martin (LM) has a problem. Their Atlas V orbital launch system, while very popular with the US military, at around US$225M per launch is too expensive to compete effectively for commercial missions, whose launch costs are generally about half that amount. As part of an effort to reposition their services, LM is now offering a 100 percent money-back or reflight guarantee if the launch vehicle causes mission failure. The guarantee covers the cost of the vehicle launch, but not the cost of the satellite. Read More
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