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— Motorcycles Review

Three ways the 2015 BMW S1000RR just saved my butt

The first edition S1000RR superbike saved my butt (and my passenger's) in a big way back in 2011, when this spectacular bit of video captured the moment a wide-running pickup ran me off the road and onto the gravel. It's only fair that we give the 2015 version the opportunity to save my butt as well, although perhaps this time with a larger safety margin. So we lined up an S1000RR at Philip Island, one of the world's fastest racetracks, and I went out and rode it as fast as I dared. And as impressive as the performance of this 199-horsepower monster is, even more impressive was the way its ingenious safety and ride assist systems prevented me from making a fool and a bum-up lawn ornament out of myself, time and time again. Read More
— Science

New boot sole rubber uses glass to grip on ice

At this time of year, people living in northern regions all over the world are faced with the same problem: icy sidewalks. Boots with otherwise grippy soles still slip, and spikes don't do well on stretches where there is no ice. Researchers from the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and the University of Toronto are developing what could be a better alternative, however – rubber soles with bits of glass embedded in them. Read More
— Children

buckle me up lets parents know if kids undo their seatbelts

Most parents are fairly diligent about making sure that their young children buckle up at the start of car trips. Unfortunately, due to the fact that many cars don't have rear seatbelt warning systems, they may not realize that their kids have released their belt while en route. Needless to say, the outcome of an accident under such circumstances could be tragic. That's why an Australian startup has launched buckle me up, a system that wirelessly adds a rear seatbelt warning system to cars that don't already have one. Read More
— Automotive

Volvo expands project enabling cars to share information on road conditions

Volvo is a company known primarily for two things: safety and cars that look like the crate they're shipped in. The company may have lost the boxy image years ago, but it has never lost its dedication to safety. At the forefront of a raft of safety trends and developments for decades, Volvo recently announced that it is escalating its ongoing project allowing cars to share information about road conditions. Read More
— Bicycles

Fly12 combines a bike headlight and an HD camera

Having a rear-facing video camera on your bike could certainly prove handy if you needed to provide legal proof that a motorist had done you wrong. Nobody wants to mount and use a GoPro on every ride, though, which is why Australian startup Cycliq developed the Fly6 – it's a tail light with a built-in mini HD camera. However, what if you need a visual record of what happened on the road in front of you? Well, you'd need the new Fly12, which is a combination headlight and camera. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Hedgehog-inspired full-body airbag would inflate into a personal safety cocoon

Last week's Wearable Technologies Conference in Munich showcased the future of cutting edge wearable design. While much of the exhibitor area was dedicated to usual suspects like performance-tracking sensors and wearable cameras, there was one design that immediately stood out. Still just a rough concept in need of partners, the i Gel protective system proposes a full-body airbag suit for protecting motorcyclists, bikers, skiers, and other hobbyists and professionals. Read More
— Automotive

CarVi brings modern driver assist technology to older cars

Driver assist technology (like the impressive array of features we reviewed in Ford’s Kuga SUV) is making new cars a lot smarter, and probably safer, every year. But what about older cars? CarVi is a stick-on unit that adds collision warnings, lane change assistance and driver skills assessment to your current ride. But we can’t decide if it’s going to be a nice addition, a missed opportunity or an annoying electronic back-seat driver. Read More
— Drones

DJI firmware update makes the White House a drone no-fly zone

Following the crash-landing of a drone on the grounds of the White House last week, the Chinese manufacturer of said drone, DJI, has released new firmware to prevent overzealous pilots flying UAVs anywhere near 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. Available to download now for owners of the company's popular Phantom 2 drones, the update signals a willingness from the company to work with regulators to clear the air for safer drone flight. Read More