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Safety


— Sports

Carbon fiber head plate to protect baseball pitchers

By - June 4, 2015 3 Pictures

Last August, Miami Marlins pitcher Dan Jennings was hit in the head by a line drive – a 101-mph (163-km/h) line drive. The horrifying video clip made any viewer hope that such an incident would never happen again. But it already has. While the risk is statistically low, comeback line drives to the head occur virtually every season in professional baseball. The MLB is trying to find a workable solution, but so far, approved protective head gear has proven bulky, awkward and extremely unpopular. Jennings is one of the major leaguers that has worked with Safer Sports Technologies in trying a lighter, lower profile solution: a carbon fiber protector that slides inside a regular ball cap.

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— Bicycles

Ding bike light uses two beams to shine down and out

By - May 29, 2015 5 Pictures

When cycling at night, it's important not just to be seen from the front and back but also from the sides. In order to make that happen, bicycle lighting systems typically either add dedicated side lights or they divert part of the main headlight beam. The Ding headlight, however, puts out one beam that shines forward, along with a second one that lights up the road directly to either side of the bike.

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— Around The Home

Saver lets people breathe while escaping fires

By - May 27, 2015 3 Pictures

While a smoke detector can certainly provide you with an early warning in the event of a house fire, it can't usually do much to help you get out of the building once that fire is underway. That's why Toronto-based startup Safety iQ developed the Saver. It's a portable device that reportedly allows users to breathe safely in smoke-filled environments, while also serving as a flashlight and alarm.

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— Bicycles

BrakePack seeks to remedy the motorist/cyclist communication breakdown

By - May 20, 2015 5 Pictures

The relationship between cyclists and motorists can be a tense, frankly unpleasant aspect of the morning commute, but a new invention by Seattle-based company Artefact (or more specifically its incubation program, Startefact) is aiming to patch things up and hopefully save some lives in the process. BrakePack is an LED-fitted smart backpack designed to make cyclists more visible to motorists, while signalling their intentions.

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Bike Balls bring bicycle nuts to all you bicycle nuts

If there are a lot of good ol' boys where you live, then you're likely familiar with Truck Nuts – rubber testicles that are hung from a pickup truck's trailer hitch. Well, a couple of Toronto-based designers have come up with something similar for bicycles. Known as Bike Balls, they actually serve as a tail light that catches motorists' attention by swinging merrily back and forth.

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— Automotive

Google reveals lessons learned (and accident count) from self-driving car program

Chris Urmson, director of the Google Self-Driving Car program, has published a post in which he admits that the small fleet (20+) of Google autonomous cars has been involved in 11 accidents over the almost 1.7 million miles (2.7 million km) the cars have traveled in the six years the vehicles have been on the road. However, Urmson was adamant that “not once was the self-driving car the cause of the accident” and revealed some of the lessons learned over the journey so far.

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— Bicycles Review

Review: Aviator and Afterburner "theft-proof" bike lights

By - May 11, 2015 9 Pictures

Bicycle commuters who regularly ride at night would no doubt appreciate having lights that could be left on their bike all the time, with little chance of them getting stolen. That's why Fortified Bicycle Alliance first introduced its Defender headlight, which can only be removed using a specialized tool. Putting out just 50 lumens, though, it's certainly more of a "be seen" than a "see the road" light. That's why Fortified more recently introduced its considerably brighter Aviator headlight and Afterburner tail light. We gave them a try, to see how they stand up to real-world use.

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