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Volvo Driver State Estimation uses a dash-mounted infrared sensor

Back in the days of black-and-white newsreels, an inventor came up with a bell on a collar that rang whenever a motorist wearing it nodded off. Since this is the 21st century, Volvo is developing a high-tech version of this gadget. It uses face recognition technology to let a car know when the driver is tired or inattentive, so appropriate action can be taken.  Read More

The Pedestrian SCOOT system follows on from TfL's Pedestrian Countdown program (Image: TfL...

Ever walk halfway across a road only to have the light change and force you to make an undignified rush to the other side? The answer is almost certainly yes. If you’re in London, that may soon be a thing of the past however, with Transport for London announcing upcoming trials of an "intelligent" pedestrian crossing. Called the Pedestrian Split Cycle Offset Optimisation Technique (SCOOT), it’s part of a £2 billion to £4 billion program to improve roads over the next ten years and decrease traffic fatalities in the capital by 40 percent by the year 2020.  Read More

The Revolights Arc knows how fast you're going, and shines accordingly

Revolights is a bicycle lighting system that first came to our attention three years ago, in which the front of the front wheel lights up to serve as a headlight, while the back of the rear wheel illuminates to act as a tail light. While it's a clever setup, at US$229 for a full kit, it's not cheap. That's why its designers have just announced a more affordable alternative called the Revolights Arc, that combines a tail light and wheel-speed-activated brake light.  Read More

One Llama's new app aims to make walking down the street with headphones safer Photo: Kuma...

Let's be honest, walking around in a busy city with loud music blasting through a pair of headphones is not a safe thing to do. Still, that doesn't stop people from doing it every day. A startup called One Llama has just announced a new application that's designed to make that activity a little less dangerous. It constantly listens to background noise, and when it hears something that the user needs to know about, such as a car horn, it automatically mutes the music and alerts them. At least, that's the promise.  Read More

Dainese says the D-air does not affect the skier's aerodynamics

We've been following the development of the Dainese D-Air Ski for just over three years, and the company has now revealed a near-competition-ready prototype to the world. Using a clever array of sensors, the protective ski garment detects a crash and rapidly inflates around the skier's upper body to protect from injury on the way down.  Read More

Cuff has launched a new range of wearable technology

Although the functionality of wearable technology may be beginning to measure up to expectations, its aesthetic form has largely been derided, and designers face the task of bridging the tech and fashion worlds. Cuff is one of a number of fledgling companies that is looking to reconcile technological prowess with head-turning looks. Its newly-launched range of fashion accessories incorporate a discrete wireless device that, when pressed, sends a notification to your chosen contacts to let them know you're trying to make contact.  Read More

VTTI researchers demonstrate connected-vehicle technology on the Northern Virginia Connect...

An important element to the notion of self-driving cars is that they are able to communicate between each other and surrounding infrastructure. While automotive manufacturers have begun to explore this technology and even banded together to hasten its emergence, the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute has been quietly working toward a similar goal. With the an award of US$1 million in funding courtesy of the US Department of Transportation, its researchers hope to develop a framework to facilitate a safe future for autonomous vehicles.  Read More

The Vaco12 tech uses bead-filled pods to dissipate impact forces

Hard plastic-coated foam is the traditional recipe for bicycle helmet design, but we've seen designers experimenting with new ways of protecting the rider's noggin. Inflatable and cardboard helmets are just two recent examples, but German company Rockwell has another idea: bean bags.  Read More

The Fly6 HD camera and tail light

The behavior of drivers at junctions monitored by cameras or on stretches of road under the ever watchful gaze of a radar can be very different to those without. Keen cyclists Andrew Hagen and Kingsley Fiegert from Perth in western Australia are on a mission to give fellow riders the same kind of power. They've designed a rear cycle light named the Fly6 that's capable of recording everything that goes on behind, the theory being that if drivers think there's a camera pointed at them, they'll give cyclists more space and show more courtesy.  Read More

The Parasol system uses passive radar sensors and mathematical algorithms to determine if ...

With aspirations to claim 80 percent of its power from renewable sources by the 2050, it follows that Germany is taking a proactive approach to its clean energy transformation. Wind farms, while set to play an important part in achieving this goal, often meet impassioned opposition from disgruntled neighbors piqued by their perpetually blinking beacons. In an effort to address this issue, researchers have developed a sensor system for wind turbines which detects nearby aircraft, switching on a beacon warning system only as they approach.  Read More

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