Advertisement
more top stories »

Road


— Robotics

Robotic 3D printer on wheels looks to fill the potholes of the future

From filling potholes to repairing busted power lines, maintaining a city's infrastructure involves some serious man hours. This labor-intensive task has recently become the target of some roboticists and engineers, who have set their sights on automating at least part of the process. Now startup Addibots is looking to get in on the action, wheeling out a roving 3D printing robot it imagines will scoot around town mending dodgy road surfaces.

Read More

Salt-impregnated asphalt de-ices itself

Living someplace that gets snow in the winter may have its perks, but the ice-melting salt that's spread on the roads isn't one of them. Besides the fact that it gets all over our cars and clothing, it also has to be reapplied throughout the winter, harming the environment in the process. If a new type of asphalt reaches production, however, salt-spreading may become a thing of the past.

Read More
— Automotive

Jaguar Land Rover uses technology to tackle potholes

Jaguar Land Rover claims that potholes cause £2.8 billion (US$4.3 billion) worth of damage every year in Britain alone. Often lurking unseen until it's too late, they can puncture or shred tires, damage wheels and suspensions, and break axles. Now the company is developing the Pothole Alert system, which can not only identify the location and severity of potholes, broken drains, raised manholes, and similar hazards, but can warn other vehicles about them as well.

Read More
— Automotive

Genty Automobile powers up Akylone hypercar concept

Genty Automobile has released further details of its 2015 Akylone concept that promises to give even the most potent supercars a run for their money. Some two years after first revealing plans to introduce a new supercar to the market, Genty has now updated and uprated its design to provide even more power, with a 366 CID V8 with twin turbos that promises to put out more than 1,200 bhp, and provide the Akylone with a blistering 0-62 mph (0-100 km/h) time of 2.7 seconds. Read More
— Environment

Brazilian ecologists launch app to reduce roadkill

In Brazil alone, officials estimate that some 475 million animals die from being struck on the nation's roads. That's around 15 animals per second, totaling more than twice the country’s human population. The Centro Brasileiro de Estudos em Ecologia de Estradas (CBEE) is working to reduce those grim statistics with the help of an app called Urubu (vulture in Portuguese), which uses the power of crowd-sourcing to identify roadkill hotspots across the country. Read More
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement