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RFID

Science

Thousands of Australian bees are getting tagged for research

Bees are integral to the pollination of major crops around the world, so the more that we understand how they go about their business, the better we can facilitate the process and thereby boost yields. With this in mind, scientists from Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) are taking the unprecedented step of equipping up to 5,000 honeybees with RFID (radio frequency identification) tags. Read More

Health & Wellbeing

eTriage armbands could get disaster victims treated faster

When emergency response crews have to deal with many casualties at once, such as at a disaster site, one of the first things they do is set up a triage system. This involves assessing the severity of each patient's injuries, so that the people who need help most urgently get it first. It's a system that works, but the EU-funded BRIDGE project is trying to make it better. The project partners are developing a new high-tech triage, that incorporates GPS and RFID technology. Read More

Around The Home

Fingerprint sensors and GPS tracking keep your firearms safe inside the Gun Box

We've been impressed with the new fingerprint-locking feature on the iPhone 5s lately, but there are many other items aside from your smartphone data that could use the extra security as well. Ryan Hyde recently designed a heavy-duty gun safe that ditches the usual key and combination locks in favor of a more protective electronic one. Once a firearm is secured safely inside, gun owners can unlock the Gun Box with an RFID-equipped bracelet (or ring), via a fingerprint scan, or a combination of the two. Read More

Good Thinking

Nightclub urinal tells patrons when they've had one too many

Alcohol and driving definitely don’t mix, but those most in need of having their keys taken away are the worst judges of how much they've had to drink. As part of an anti-drink/drive campaign by Singapore’s Zouk nightclub, DDB Group Singapore developed the Pee Analyzer: a system fitted to urinals that tests patrons’ alcohol levels every time they take a trip to the bathroom.Read More

Around The Home

Recordura electronic door lock generates its own electricity

Smartphone-enabled electronic door locks such as the Unikey, Lockitron and Goji do have advantages over their traditional counterparts – digital “keys” can be sent to multiple users’ phones, access to locked rooms can be limited to specific dates and/or times for certain users, and keys stored on lost phones can simply be deactivated. However, as with just about any electronic version of a purely-mechanical device, they do introduce one complicating factor: they require a power supply. The Recordura lock, however, generates its own electricity when users push on its handle. Read More

Automotive

No more quarters or tickets: Audi tests wireless parking payments

We've heard about cars that can park themselves, but such technology brings up a relevant question: how will such cars handle paid parking lots? Sure, you could drop them off after picking up your parking ticket, but Audi has a better idea. Its "Audi connect wireless payment" system, which is undergoing trials now, allows for two-way payment communications between car and parking facility. Read More

Health & Wellbeing

intelligentM ensures that healthcare workers wash their hands

Although it may be surprising to hear that being in the hospital can make a person sick, it definitely does happen. In the United States, about one in every 20 people admitted to a hospital will end up with a healthcare acquired infection, or HAI. Of those people, approximately 100,000 die from such infections annually. One of the keys to reducing the occurrence of HAIs is to get healthcare workers to wash their hands frequently and thoroughly – which is just what the intelligentM bracelet is designed to do. Read More

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