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RFID

— Good Thinking

Nightclub urinal tells patrons when they've had one too many

By - July 20, 2013 6 Pictures
Alcohol and driving definitely don’t mix, but those most in need of having their keys taken away are the worst judges of how much they've had to drink. As part of an anti-drink/drive campaign by Singapore’s Zouk nightclub, DDB Group Singapore developed the Pee Analyzer: a system fitted to urinals that tests patrons’ alcohol levels every time they take a trip to the bathroom. Read More
— Around The Home

Recordura electronic door lock generates its own electricity

By - July 3, 2013 3 Pictures
Smartphone-enabled electronic door locks such as the Unikey, Lockitron and Goji do have advantages over their traditional counterparts – digital “keys” can be sent to multiple users’ phones, access to locked rooms can be limited to specific dates and/or times for certain users, and keys stored on lost phones can simply be deactivated. However, as with just about any electronic version of a purely-mechanical device, they do introduce one complicating factor: they require a power supply. The Recordura lock, however, generates its own electricity when users push on its handle. Read More
— Automotive

No more quarters or tickets: Audi tests wireless parking payments

By - June 11, 2013 4 Pictures
We've heard about cars that can park themselves, but such technology brings up a relevant question: how will such cars handle paid parking lots? Sure, you could drop them off after picking up your parking ticket, but Audi has a better idea. Its "Audi connect wireless payment" system, which is undergoing trials now, allows for two-way payment communications between car and parking facility. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

intelligentM ensures that healthcare workers wash their hands

By - June 4, 2013 1 Picture
Although it may be surprising to hear that being in the hospital can make a person sick, it definitely does happen. In the United States, about one in every 20 people admitted to a hospital will end up with a healthcare acquired infection, or HAI. Of those people, approximately 100,000 die from such infections annually. One of the keys to reducing the occurrence of HAIs is to get healthcare workers to wash their hands frequently and thoroughly – which is just what the intelligentM bracelet is designed to do. Read More
— Games

The world's most high-tech (and expensive) Scrabble board

By - November 19, 2012 3 Pictures
With its basic game board and lettered tiles, Scrabble is about as low-tech of a game as you can get. But that hasn't stopped Mind Sports International from giving the game's iconic board a 21st century upgrade. For the company's upcoming festival in Prague, a new Scrabble board was built that uses RFID chips in each tile to detect where each letter is placed and transmit the data online almost instantly. Read More
— Around The Home

New system uses RFID tech to keep track of your ... socks?

By - September 26, 2012 3 Pictures
If you’re someone who can afford really fancy socks, then it’s entirely possible that you might not want to “lower” yourself to the act of going into a store to buy them. That’s why Switzerland’s BLACKSOCKS started its Sockscription system, in which users regularly receive premium new Italian socks by mail. It doesn’t stop there, however. The company is now offering Smarter Socks, which communicate with the user’s iPhone to deliver the, um ... ultimate sock-sorting experience. Read More

Blokket takes your RFID-chipped devices off the grid

Identity theft is a constant concern in the digital age, and the inclusion of RFID chips in just about everything from cell phones to passports unfortunately opens up another avenue for would-be thieves to lift your data. The only way to really know you were secure would be to block all wireless frequencies from reaching your IDs and gadgets. ThinkGeek's solution is the Blokket, a small pouch designed to hold mobile devices or RFID-chipped IDs and block them from receiving any incoming wireless signals. Read More

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