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RFID

Electronics

"Unhackable" RFID chip to keep your credit cards safe

Radio frequency identification (RFID) chips have made cashless payments commonplace and opened the way to automatic inventory control. However, they've also made it possible for credit card details and other private information to be stolen wirelessly. To make things a bit more secure, MIT and Texas Instruments are developing an "unhackable" RFID chip that's designed to fend off information-stealing attacks.Read More

Electronics

GE RFID tech turns stickers into explosives detectors

A global economy brings many benefits, but it also makes international terrorism extremely difficult to combat. With more goods passing through the world's shipping terminals and airports than ever before, hunting explosives with large, static detectors or teams of inspectors armed with detecting devices and reagents is a bottleneck that increases the chances of evasion. To help US counterterrorism efforts, GE has developed RFID stickers that act as wireless, battery-free explosives detectors that can be placed almost anywhere. Read More

Drones

Fraunhofer developing flying inventory robots to keep tabs on stock

Inventories are a necessary evil that need to be carried out at least once a year. Despite their necessity, they are also tedious, time consuming, labor intensive, and often involve businesses shutting their doors for whole days as they count how many unsold widgets are in the back room. The Fraunhofer Institute's InventAIRy Project plans to change that by developing a new flying robotic drone that not only takes over the drudgery of stock taking, but also acts as a new tool for record keeping and streamlining warehouse operations.Read More

The Affair: Unhackable fashion?

A London-based label has created a line of clothing inspired by George Orwell's 1984 featuring pockets which can block all wireless transmissions, meaning your phone cannot be hacked or credit card details stolen.Read More

Robotics

RFID tags may help household robots locate hidden objects

In order for household robots to be truly useful, it would be great if they could go and get items for you, without having to be shown where those things are. Thanks to research being carried out at Georgia Tech, that may someday be the case. A robot there is now able to search out hidden objects – as long as they've been labelled first. Read More

Sports

RFID tags to enable real-time tracking of NFL players

Following in the footsteps of the NBA, which introduced player tracking technology in every one of its arenas for the 2013-14 season, the NFL has announced its own player tracking system. Unlike the NBA system provided by Stats LLC, which uses cameras to collect location data, the NFL will use the MotionWorks system from Zebra Technologies that relies on RFID tags that will be placed inside player shoulder pads.Read More

Wearables

Health info tattoo wins Intel Make It Wearable award

Intel has announced the winner in the second round of the of its Make It Wearable contest, Visionary Track. Student, maker and DIY enthusiast Mael Flament proposed an invisible tattoo that contains our health information. Med. History 2.0 would be easily scanned and updated regularly.Read More

Science

Thousands of Australian bees are getting tagged for research

Bees are integral to the pollination of major crops around the world, so the more that we understand how they go about their business, the better we can facilitate the process and thereby boost yields. With this in mind, scientists from Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) are taking the unprecedented step of equipping up to 5,000 honeybees with RFID (radio frequency identification) tags. Read More

Health & Wellbeing

eTriage armbands could get disaster victims treated faster

When emergency response crews have to deal with many casualties at once, such as at a disaster site, one of the first things they do is set up a triage system. This involves assessing the severity of each patient's injuries, so that the people who need help most urgently get it first. It's a system that works, but the EU-funded BRIDGE project is trying to make it better. The project partners are developing a new high-tech triage, that incorporates GPS and RFID technology. Read More

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