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Environment

Adidas uses ocean trash to make footwear – and a statement

The world’s oceans are in peril due to a combination of pollution, overfishing and climate change. Recently, the Alfred-Wegener-Institut, a German center for polar and marine research, sent out a strong warning about fundamental changes that are occurring in those ecosystems. But awareness is growing and the fight to preserve the oceans has found an ally in Adidas, which has teamed with conservation group Parley for the Oceans to create footwear made with trash harvested from the ocean.Read More

Architecture

Reclaimed Modern home hits near net zero

When we think about sustainable homes, we tend to think about energy usage. A new home in Columbia City, US, can claim to not only be energy efficient, but to make sustainable use of materials. Reclaimed Modern has near net zero energy consumption and is built using reclaimed metal, wood and concrete.Read More

Architecture

Parasitic shelter is available to anyone who needs it

Can "guerrilla architecture" be used to promote radical collective ideas? Such is the intriguing premise behind Bow-House. Created by French architect Stéphane Malka, who has a keen interest in using his skills to help reclaim neglected inner-city areas for those less fortunate, the project comprises a shelter built from recycled materials that is available to anyone who needs a place to stay. Read More

Architecture

One man's garbage is another man's ... house?

Can garbage be used as an eco-material to construct a house? That's the intriguing premise behind the recently-completed Waste House project, which is believed by those involved to be the first permanent British building built almost solely from waste and recycled materials. Constructed at the University of Brighton's Grand Parade campus, the Waste House is an ongoing experiment which aims to prove, in the organizer's own words, that "there is no such thing as waste, just stuff in the wrong place." Read More

Children

Buildies bring stability to childhood forts

As children, most of us would have constructed shaky fortresses out of pillows, mattresses and mom's best manchester. In the eyes of Illinois-based product designer Brian Lilly, these essential life experiences could be even more valuable if there was a little structural stability added to the mix. Buildies is a kit of cardboard blocks and connectors designed to teach kids about engineering, all while letting their imaginations run wild. Read More

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